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[D]

Da Li
“Spring Festival Eve.” Tr. Song Shouquan. In Jianing Chen, ed. Themes in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Beijing: New World Press, 1993, 263-81.


Dai Houying 戴厚英
"On Behalf of Humanism: The Confession of a Former Leftist." Tr. Frances LaFleur. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, Inc., 1992, 27-33.

Stones of the Wall. Tr. Frances Wood. London: Joseph, 1985.


Dai Qing 戴晴
"Anticipation." Tr. Billy Bikales. In Perry Link, ed., Roses and Thorns: The Second Blooming of the Hundred Flowers in Chinese Fiction. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984, 146-67.

"The Case of Chu Anping." In Geremie Barme, New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 358-62

"From Lin Zexu to Chiang Ching-kuo." In Geremie Barme, New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 184-90.

"How I Experienced the Cultural Revolution." In China for Women: Travel and Culture. NY : Feminist Press, 1995, 79-85.

"My Imprisonment: An Excerpt." Tr. Geremie Barme. Index on Censorship 8 (1992): 20-27.

"No!" Tr. Dale R. Johnson. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Contemporary Chinese Literature: An Anthology of Post-Mao Fiction and Poetry. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1984, 1985, 109-114.

The River Dragon Has Come!: The Three Gorges Dam and the Fate of China's Yangtze River and It's People. Compiled by Dai Qing; edited by John G. Thibodeau and Philip B. William; translated by Yi Ming. Armonk, N.Y. : M.E. Sharpe, 1998. [includes an essay by Dai]

(and Luo Ke) "A Sexy Lady." In Geremie Barme, New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 293-311.

Tiananmen Follies: Prison Memoirs and Other Writings. Trs/Eds. Nancy Yang Liu, Peter Rand, and Lawrence R. Sullivan. Foreword by Ian Buruma. Norwalk, CT: Eastbridge Books, 2004.

"The Unexpected Tide." Tr. Zhu Hong. In Zhu Hong, ed., The Serenity of Whiteness: Stories By and About Women in Contemporary China. NY: Ballantine Books, 1991, 42-71.

Wang Shiwei and "Wild lilies": Rectification and Purges in the Chinese Communist Party, 1942-1944. Edited by David E. Apter and Timothy Cheek; translated by Nancy Liu and Lawrence R. Sullivan. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1994.


Dai Sijie 戴思杰
Balzac and the Little Seamstress. NY: Anchor Books, 2002.

Mr. Muo's Travelling Couch. NY: Knopf, 2005.


Dai Wangshu 戴望舒
Dai Wangshu: The Life and Poetry of a Chinese Modernist. Gregory Lee. HK: The Chinese University Press,1989. [a study with extensive translations]

"Dai Wangshu's Poetic Theory." Tr. Kirk A. Denton. In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 316-17.

Poems in: Modern Chinese Poetry. Ed. Acton; Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Ed. Kai-yu Hsu. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1963, 169-75.


Dai Xunyang
"Her Despondency." Tr. Jeffrey Toy Eng. The Chinese Pen, (Winter, 1987): 35-42.


Deng Enming
"The Condition of Female Education in Jinan" (1921). Chinese Studies of History 31, 2 (Winter 1997/98): 55-60.


Deng Gang 邓刚
"Big Fish" (Dayu). Tr. Hu Zhihui. Chinese Literature (Summer 1985): 133-46.

"The Dragon King's Troops Thunder Past" (Longbing guo). Tr. Lu Binghong. Chinese Literature (Autumn 1986): 15-44.

"The Lure of the Sea" (Miren de hai). Tr. Lu Binghong. Chinese Literature (Spring 1984): 5-37.

"Prawn Battle" (Xia zhan). Chinese Literature (Spring 1992): 3-19.

"Shuqin Catches Prawns" (Luhua xia). Tr. Xiong Zhenru. Chinese Literature (Autumn 1984): 68-80.


Deng Yiguang 邓一光
"Life after Retirement." Tr. Yu Fanqin. Chinese Literature (Spring 1998).

"Shenzhen Is Located at 22°27'-22°55'. Tr. Ken Liu. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 51-66.


Deng Youmei 邓友梅
"Han the Forger." In Carolyn Choa and David Su Li-qun, eds., The Vintage Book of Contemporary Chinese Fiction. NY: Vintage Books, 2001, 191-204.

"Na Five." [partial] Tr. Gladys Yang. In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China's Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1991, 48-77. Also translated as “Na Wu.” Tr. Gladys Yang. In Jianing Chen, ed. Themes in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Beijing: New World Press, 1993, 35-76.

Snuff-Bottles and Other Stories. Tr. Gladys Yang. Beijing: Chinese Literature, 1986.


Di An
"William's Tomb." Tr. Alice Xin Liu. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 1 (2011): 71-86.


Di Yi
"The Noodle Lady." Tr. David Steelman. The Chinese Pen (Spring, 1977):1-21.


Ding Heng
"A Heart in Earnest." In Chinese Women Writers' Association, eds., The Muse of China: A Collection of Prose and Short Stories. Taipei: Chinese Women Writers' Association, 1974, 127-50.


Ding Jiu
"The Three Pagodas." In Harold Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1974, 261-73.


Ding Ling 丁玲
"A Bullet Never Fired" (1937). Tr. Tommy McClellan. Renditions 58 (Nov. 2002): 117-126.

"A Certain Night." In Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories. Beijing: Panda Books, 1985.

"The Content and Subjects of Poetry Should Be Diverse." In Hualing Nieh, ed./tr. Literature of the Hundred Flowers. 2 vols. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, II: 48-51.

"Day." In A. Dooling and K. Torgeson, eds., Writing Women in Modern China: An Anthology of Women's Literature from the Early Twenties. NY: Columbia UP, 1998, 263-74.

"Daughter of the Chinese People." In China for Women: Travel and Culture. NY: Feminist Press, 1995, 71-78.

"The Diary of Miss Sophia." In Harold Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1974, 129-69.

"Du Wanxiang." Chinese Literature 1 (1980): 31-57. Also in Tani Barlow, ed., I Myself am a Woman: Selected Writings of Ding Ling. Boston: Beacon Press, 1989.

"The Flood" [Shui]. Asia 35 (1935). Also in: Edgar Snow, ed., Living China: Modern Chinese Stories. NY: Reynal and Hitchcock, 1936, 154-65.

"The Flood." Tr. of first chapter in Edgar Snow, ed., Living China. Modern Chinese Short Stories. NY: Reynald and Hitchcock, 1937, 154-64.

"Foolish Dreams: Like a Blind Person Going Fishing." Tr. Zha Jianying. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 302-306.

"From Night to Morning" [Cong yewan dao tianliang]. Tr. Ruth Nybakken. In M. Arkin and B. Shollar, eds. Longman Anthology of World Literature By Women, 1875-1975. NY: Longman, 1989, 402-07.

"From Dusk to Dawn." In Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories. Beijing: Panda Books, 1985.

"The Hamlet." In Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories. Beijing: Panda Books, 1985.

I Myself am a Woman: Selected Writings of Ding Ling. Ed. and Tr. Tani Barlow (with Gary Bjorge). Boston: Beacon Press, 1989.

"In the Hospital." Tr. Susan Vacca. Renditions, 8 (1977): 123-35. Also in C.T. Hsia, et al. eds., Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas, 1919-1949. NY: Columbia UP, 1981.

Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories. Beijing: Panda Books, 1985.

"Miss Sopie's Diary." In Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories. Beijing: Panda Books, 1985.

"Mother." In Tani Barlow, ed., I Myself am a Woman: Selected Writings of Ding Ling. Boston: Beacon Press, 1989.

"New Year." In J. Anderson and T. Mumford, eds. and trs., Chinese Women Writers: A Collection of Short Stories by Chinese Women Writers of the 1920s and 1930s. SF: China Books and Periodicals, 1985, 13-31.

"News." In Edgar Snow, ed. Living China: Modern Chinese Short Stories. NY: Reynal and Hitchcock, 1936, 165-72.

"Night of Death—Dawn of Freedom." In Ming-ting Cze, ed., Short Stories: Short Stories from China. Moscow: Cooperative Publishing Society of Foreign Workers in the USSR, 1935, 67-73.

"On Qingyun Lane" (Qingyun li zhong). In Munro, ed. Genesis of a Revolution. Also appears as "A House on Qingyun Lane." In J. Anderson and T. Mumford, eds. and trs., Chinese Women Writers: A Collection of Short Stories by Chinese Women Writers of the 1920s and 1930s. SF: China Books and Periodicals, 1985, 4-12.

"One Certain Night." Tr. George Kennedy. In Harold Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, 1974, 254-60.

Our Children and Others. Tr. Meng Tsiang. Shanghai: Yingwen xuehui, 1941.

"The Reunion." In Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories. Beijing: Panda Books, 1985.

"Rushing." In Miss Sophie's Diary and Other Stories. Beijing: Panda Books, 1985.

"Shanghai, Spring, 1931." In Tani Barlow, ed., I Myself am a Woman: Selected Writings of Ding Ling. Boston: Beacon Press, 1989.

"Sketches from the 'Cattle Shed'." Tr. R.A. Roberts. In R.A. Roberts and A. Knox, eds., One Half of the Sky. London: Heinemann, 1987, 82-91.

"Sophia's Diary." Tr. Joseph S.M. Lau. Tamkang Review, 5, 1 (1974): 57-96.

The Sun Shines Over the Sanggan River. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1984.

"The Trial (excerpt from The Sun Shinese Over the Sangkan River)." In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 243-56.

"We Need the Zawen Essay." Tr. Ruth Nybakken. In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 455-57.

"When I Was In Xia Village." Tr. Gary J. Bjorge. In Joseph Lau and H. Goldblatt, eds., The Columbia Antholody of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 1995, 143-58. Also in C.T. Hsia, et al. eds., Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas, 1919-1949. NY: Columbia UP, 1981.

When I Was in Sha Chuan and Other Stories. Tr. Pu-sheng Kung. Poona, India: Kutub Publishers, n.d. [includes “When I was in Sha Chuan,” “Night,” “New Faith,” “Ping-Ping,” and “The Soldier and the Journalist”]


Ding Mang
Poems in: Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 179-80.


Ding Xilin 丁西林
"Dear Husband." Trs. Bonnie S. McDougall and Flora Lam. Renditions 69 (2008): 62-75.

"Flushed with Wine" (Jiu hou). Trs. John B. Weinstein and Carsey Yee. MCLC Resource Center Publication (March 2004). [includes "Translators' Introduction" and images and video of a Nov. 2002 production of the play at Simon's Rock College of Bard]

"Oppression" (Yapo). In Edward Gunn, ed., Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983, 41-51. Also translated as "The Oppressed," in Ku Tsong-nee, ed., Modern Chinese Plays. Shanghai: The Commercial Press, 1941, 55-74.; and tr. Joseph Lau. Renditions 3: 117-27; and trs. John B. Weinstein and Carsey Yee. In in Xiaomei Chen, ed., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama. NY: Columbia UP, 2010, 152-64.

"Three Dollars in National Currency:A One-Act Comedy by Ding Xilin." Tr. Christopher Rea. Asian Theater Journal 25, 2 (Fall 2008): 173-92.

"A Wasp." Tr. John B. Weinstein and Carsey Yee.


Ding Xiaqi 丁小琦
Maidenhome. trs. Chris Berry. SF: Aunt Lute Books, 1994


Dong Hong
"The Eyes of a Kirghiz Girl." Chinese Literature (Spring 1997).

"Love, Galloping on Horseback." Chinese Literature (Spring 1997).

"My Life is on the Mountain Path." Chinese Literature (Spring 1997).

"The Songs of Herdsmen." Chinese Literature (Spring 1997).

"Trekking Towards The Peak of Mount Tomur." Chinese Literature (Spring 1997).


Dong Hongwei

"Gan Xiaocao's Bamboo Pole."In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia University Press, 2006, 89-91.


Dong Nian
"Fire." Tr. Nathan K. Mao and Winston Yang. In Joseph S.M. Lau, ed., The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Taiwan Fiction Since 1926. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 250-61.

"First Trip." Tr. Eve Markowitz. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1989): 68-77.


Dong Ping (see Qiu Dongping)


Dong Qizhang (Dung Kai Cheung) 董启章
"The Atlas: Archaeology of an Imaginary City" (Ditu ji: yige xiangxiang de chengshi de kaoguxue). Tr. Dung Kai Cheung. In Martha P.Y. Cheung, ed., Hong Kong Collage: Contemporary Stories and Writing. HK: Oxford University Press, 1998, 40-54.

Atlas: The Archaeology of an Imaginary City. Trs. Dung Kai-chueng, Anders Hannson, and Bonnie S. McDougall. NY: Columubia UP, 2012. [MCLC Resource Center review by Sebastian Veg]

[Abstract: Set in the long-lost City of Victoria (a fictional world similar to Hong Kong), Atlas is written from the unified perspective of future archaeologists struggling to rebuild a thrilling metropolis. Divided into four sections--"Theory," "The City," "Streets," and "Signs"--the novel reimagines Victoria through maps and other historical documents and artifacts, mixing real-world scenarios with purely imaginary people and events while incorporating anecdotes and actual and fictional social commentary and critique. Much like the quasi-fictional adventures in map-reading and remapping explored by Paul Auster, Jorge Luis Borges, and Italo Calvino, Dung Kai-cheung's novel challenges the representation of place and history and the limits of technical and scientific media in reconstructing a history. It best exemplifies the author's versatility and experimentation, along with China's rapidly evolving literary culture, by blending fiction, nonfiction, and poetry in a story about succeeding and failing to recapture the things we lose. Playing with a variety of styles and subjects, Dung Kai-cheung inventively engages with the fate of Hong Kong since its British "handover" in 1997, which officially marked the end of colonial rule and the beginning of an uncharted future]

"The Centaur of the East" (Dongfang banrenma). Tr. Dung Kai Cheung. In Martha P.Y. Cheung, ed., Hong Kong Collage: Contemporary Stories and Writing. HK: Oxford University Press, 1998, 202-204.

"A Government House with a View" (Zongdu fu de jingguan). Tr. Dung Kai Cheung. In Martha P.Y. Cheung, ed., Hong Kong Collage: Contemporary Stories and Writing. HK: Oxford University Press, 1998, 83-84.

"Windows 98 and South Park." Tr. Joshua Dyer. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 151-54.


Dongfang Bai 東方白
"The Golden Dream." Tr. Helena Chang-hsu. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1977): 24-37. Republished as "Dream of Gold" in Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 351-61.


Du Guoqing (Tu Kuo-ch'ing)
Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 121-24.

Poems in: Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 21 (July 2007): 115-22.


Du Pengcheng 杜鹏程
Defend Yenan. Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1958; rpt. 1983.

In Days of Peace. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1961.

"Lingkuan Gorge." In Sowing the Clouds: A Collection of Chinese Short Stories. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1961, 1-5.

"Yenan People." In I Knew All Along and Other Stories. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1960, 55-70.


Du Shisan  
"Five Kinds of Beverages." Tr. Jennifer O'Neal. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1988): 56-60.


Du Ye (Tu Yeh)
Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 189-94.


Duan Caihua
"The Feast of 'Flower Pattern' Wine." Tr. Yen Yuan-shu. In Chi Pang-yuan, et al., eds., An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Literature. Taipei: National Institute for Compilation and Translation, 1975, 2: 235-47.


Duan Ping
"Major's Dimples." Tr. Ma Aiying. Chinese Literature (Spring 1998).


Duanmu Hongliang 端木蕻良
"Despoiler of the Crop." Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Chinese Literature 5 (1963): 39-56.

"Hatred." Tr. Kuang Wendong. Chinese Literature 8 (1983): 51-68.

"Homesick." Chinese Literature website.

"The Far-away Wind and Sand." Tr. Clara Sun and Nathan Mao. In Joseph S.M. Lau, Leo Ou-fan Lee, and C.T. Hsia, eds., Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas, 1918-1948. NY: Columbia UP.

"Looking for a House." Tr. Michael Lestz. Modern Chinese Literature 6, 1 (1980): 31-41.

"Lost." In Chinese Stories from the Thirties. 2 vols. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 2: 86-101.

"The Osprey Village." Chinese Literature website.

"The Rapid Currents of Muddy River." Tr. Margaret Baumgartner and Nathan Mao. In Joseph S.M. Lau, Leo Ou-fan Lee, and C.T. Hsia, eds., Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas, 1918-1948. NY: Columbia University Press.

Red Night. Beijing: Panda Books, 1988.

"Shadows on Egret Lake." Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Chinese Literature 4 (1962): 54-63. Rpt. in Stories from the Thirties. 2 vols. Beijing: Panda Books, 1982, 2: 73-85. Also trans. by Yuan Chi-hua and Robert Payne as "The Sorrows of the Lake of Egrets." In Yuan and Payne, eds., Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. London: Noel Carrington, Transatlantic Arts Co., 1946, 118-129; reprinted in James Miller, et al., eds., Literature of the Eastern World. Glenview, Ill.: Scott, Foresman, 1970, 103-110.

Sorrows of Egret Lake: Selected Short Stories of Duanmu Hongliang. Trs. Howard Goldblatt and Haili Kong. HK: Chinese University Press, 2009. [bilingual edition]

"Tiger." In Yuan Chia-hua and Robert Payne, eds., Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. London: Noel Carrington, 1946.


Duo Duo 多多
"At Dawn's Gunpoint Lingering Smoke Rises." Tr. Mai Mang. World Literature Today (March/April 2011): 49.

The Boy Who Catches Wasps - Translations of the Recent Poetry of Duoduo. Tr. Gregory Lee. Brookline: Zephyr Press, 2002. [reivewed by Kazim Ali for Electronic Poetry Review]

"Courtyard," "Amsterdam's River." Tr. George O'Connell and Diana Shi. Atlanta Review xiv, 2 (Spring/Summer 2008): 80-82

Crossing the Sea (Guo hai). Ed/tr Lee Robinson and Yu Li Ming. Concord, Ont.: Anansi, 1998.

"The Day I Got to Xi'an." Tr. John A. Crespi. In Howard Goldblatt, ed., Chairman Mao Would Not Be Amused: Fiction from Today's China. NY: Grove Press, 1995, 99-111.

Depths of Flames. Tr. Jin Zhong. Beijing: 1989.

"It's Just Like Before," "Five Years," "Those Islands," "Never a Dreamer," "Returning." Tr. Gregory Lee. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 58-63.

"Just Like Before." Tr. Gregory B. Lee. Tinfish 3 (1996): 41-42.

"Living Together." Tr. Mai Mang. World Literature Today (March/April 2011): 49.

Looking Out From Death: From the Cultural Revolution to Tiananmen Square. Trs. Gregory Lee and John Cayley. London: Bloomsbury Pub. Ltd., 1989.

"Poems." Trs. Gregory B. Lee. Wasafiri 55 (2008): 43-44.

"Promise." Tr. Mai Mang. World Literature Today (March/April 2011): 57.

"Selected Translations of Duo Duo (part I)." Tr. Gregory Lee. Interpoetics: Poetry of Asia and the Pacific Rim 1, 1 (Summer 1997).

"Selected Translations of Duo Duo (part II)." Tr. Gregory Lee. Interpoetics: Poetry of Asia and the Pacific Rim 1, 2 (Spring 1998).

Snow Plain. Tr. John Crespi. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2010.

Statements: The New Chinese Poetry of Duo Duo. Trs. Gregory Lee and John Cayley. London: Wellsweep, 1989.

"This Is the Reason We Perservere: The 2010 Neustadt Prize Lecture." Tr. Mai Mang. World Literature Today (March/April 2011): 46-47.

"Translations of Exile Poems by Duoduo." Tr. Gregory Lee. In Gregory Lee, ed., Chinese Writing and Exile. Chicago: Center for East Asian Studies, The University of Chicago, 1993, 139-46.

"Underground Poetry in Beijing, 1970-1978." Tr. John Cayley. In Henry Zhao and Cayley, eds., Under-sky Underground: Chinese Writing Today #1. London: Wellsweep, 1994, 97-104.

"Wake Up." In Kerry Flattley & Chris Wallace-Crabbe, eds., From the Republic of Conscience: An International Anthology of Poetry. Fredonia, N.Y.: White Pine Press, 1993, p. 26.

"When People Rise from Cheese: Statement #1," "The Production of Language Is in the Kitchen." Tr. John Rosenwald, et.al. The Beloit Poetry Journal (Chapbook 19) (Winter 1988/89): 4-7.

[E]


Er Can
"The Travels of Erh Ts'an." Tr. Vivian Hsu and Samuel Ling. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1979): 49-67.


Er Yuehe 二月河
"Emperor Yongzheng (Excerpts)." Tr. Xiong Zhenru. Chinese Literature (Autumn 1998).


[F]


Fan Xiaoqing
"Return to Secular Life." In Six Contemporary Chinese Women Writers, IV. Beijing: Panda, 1995, 146-83.


Fan Yanqiao
"A Writer’s Tribulations." Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Wong, Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 205-14.


Fang Fang 方方
Children of the Bitter River: A Novel (Fengjing). Tr. Herbert Batt. Norwalk, CT: Eastbridge Books, 2007.

"Hints." Tr. Ling Yuan. Chinese Literature (Summer 1997). Also in Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One's Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 215-48.

"May My Dream Come True." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 45-47.

"Predestined." Tr. Zhang Siying. Chinese Literature (Winter 1998).

"Obedience Versus Disobedience." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 37-38.

"Stakeout." Tr. Zhang Siying. Chinese Literature (Summer 1997).

Three Novellas By Fang Fang: Contemporary Chinese Women Writers V. Panda, 1996.

"On Women." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 41-43.

"Women's Eyes." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 39.


Fang Hao
"My Mother." Tr. Wu Wang Hen-ling. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1978): 106-115.


Fang Jing
Poems in Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Ed. Hsu Kai-yu. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1963.


Fang Qi (Fang Ch'i)
Poems in China, China: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan, Republic of China. Eds. Germain Groogenbroodt and Peter Stinson. Ninove, Belgium: Point Books, 1986.


Fang Shumin
"The Moon on a Frosty Morning." Tr. W.J.F. Jenner. In W.J.F. Jenner, ed. Modern Chinese Stories. London: Oxford UP, 1970, 220-29.


Fang Weide
Poems in Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Ed. Hsu Kai-yu. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1963, 127-30.


Fang Yu
"The Waterfall, A Stranger" (Mosheng de pubu). Tr. Ronald Egan. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 1 (Aug. 1996).


Fang Zhi
"Taking Charge." Tr. Margeret Decker. In Helen Siu, ed. Furrows, Peasants, Intellectuals and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1990, 134-46.

"A Traitor in the Ranks." Tr. Howard Goldblatt and George Cheng. In Prize Winning Stories From China, 1978-1979. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1981, 334-83.


Fei Dao 飞刀
"The Demon's Head." Tr. David Hull. Renditions 77/78 (Spring/Autumn 2012): 263-71.


Fei Ma
Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 117-20.


Fei Ming, see Feng Wenbing


Feng Jicai 冯骥才
Chrysanthemums and Other Stories. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace, Javanovich, 1985.

"Fragrant Lotus" [from Three-Inch Golden Lotus]. In Geremie Barme, New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 121-30.

"Granny Drunkard." In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia University Press, 2006, 180-82.

Let One Hundred Flowers Bloom. Tr. Christopher Smith. London/NY: Viking, 1995.

"The Tall Woman and Her Short Husband." Tr. Gladys Yang. In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China's Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1991, 85-98. Rpt. in Carolyn Choa and David Su Li-qun, eds., The Vintage Book of Contemporary Chinese Fiction. NY: Vintage Books, 2001, 237-48. Also tr. By Simon Johnstone. In Jianing Chen, ed. Themes in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Beijing: New World Press, 1993, 302-19.

Ten Years of Madness: Oral Histories of China's Cultural Revolution. San Francisco: China Books, 1996.

The Miraculous Pigtail. Beijing: Panda Books, 1987.

The Three-Inch Golden Lotus. trs. David Wakefield. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1992.

Voices from the Whirlwind: An Oral History of the Cultural Revlolution. Tr. Denny Chu, Cap Hong, Cathy Cilber, and Lawrence Tedesco. NY: Pantheon, 1991.

“Winding Brook Way.” Tr. Susan Wilf Chen. In Chrysanthemums and Other Stories by Feng Jicai. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanivich, 1985, 165-171

"A Written Testimonial: About the Cultural Revolution." Tr. Phillip Williams. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayls. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, Inc., 1992, 15-19.


Feng Keng 馮鏗
"The Child Pedlar." In J. Anderson and T. Mumford, eds. and trs., Chinese Women Writers: A Collection of Short Stories by Chinese Women Writers of the 1920s and 1930s. SF: China Books and Periodicals, 1985, 129-36.


Feng Liang
"In Search of Musk." Tr. Herbert Batt. In Batt, ed., Tales of Tibet: Sky Burials, Prayer Wheels, and Wind Horses. Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 217-24.


Feng Shuluan 冯叔鸾
"The Red Chips." Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Wong, Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 29-36.


Feng Tang
"Mahjong." Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 2 (2012): 66-73.


Feng Wenbing 冯文炳
Bridge [excerpt]. Tr. Christopher Smith. Chinese Literature (Spring 1990): 119-22.

"Caltrop Pond." Tr. Christopher Smith. Chinese Literature (Spring 1990): 113-18. Tr. in French as "L'etang aux chataignes d'eau." In Le fox-trot de Shanghai et autres novelles chinoises. Trs/eds. Isabelle Rabut and Angel Pino. Paris: Albin Michel, 1996, 35-41.

"Little Sister," in Contemporary Chinese Stories. Ed. Chi-chen Wang. Wesport, CT: Greenwood, 1944; NY: Columbia UP, 1944.

"On Modern Poetry." In Harold Action and Chen Shih-hsiang, eds./trs., Modern Chinese Poetry. London: Duckworth, 1936.

"The Story of the Bamboo Grove." Tr. Li Guoqing. Chinese Literature (Spring 1990): 108-12. Tr. in French as "Une histoire dans la foret de bambous." In Le fox-trot de Shanghai et autres novelles chinoises. Trs/eds. Isabelle Rabut and Angel Pino. Paris: Albin Michel, 1996, 23-34.

Poems in: Anthology of Modern Chinese Poetry. Ed/tr. Michelle Yeh. New Haven: Yale UP, 1992, 22-24.


Feng Xuefeng 冯雪峰
"The Cow and Her Rope." In Hualing Nieh, ed. and co-trans., Literature of the Hundred Flowers Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia University Press, 1981, 307.

"The Duckling Who Became 'Prince in Exile'." In Hualing Nieh, ed. and co-trans., Literature of the Hundred Flowers Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia University Press, 1981, 307-308.

Fables. San Francisco: China Books and Periodicals, 1983.

"The Snake and the Hare." In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers Volume II: Poetry and Fiction, NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 308-309.

"The Young Also Need the Hundred Flowers Blooming to Help Them Grow." In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 58-60.


Feng Youlan 冯友兰
The Hall of Three Pines: An Account of My Life. Tr. Denis Mair. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2000.


Feng Yuanjun 冯沅君
"The Journey." In J. Anderson and T. Mumford, eds. and trs., Chinese Women Writers: A Collection of Short Stories by Chinese Women Writers of the 1920s and 1930s. SF: China Books and Periodicals, 1985, 168-78.

An Outline History of Classical Chinese Literature. Tr. Yang Xianyi and Gladys Yang. HK: Joint Publishing Co., 1983.

"Separation." Tr. Janet Ng. In A. Dooling and K. Torgeson, eds., Writing Women in Modern China: An Anthology of Women's Literature from the Early Twentieth Century. NY: Columbia UP, 1998, 105-113.


Feng Zhi 冯至
Poems in: Anthology of Chinese Literature. 2 vols. Ed. Cyril Birch. NY: Grove Press, 1972, vol. 2.; Chinese Literature 3 (1963); Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Ed. Payne; Feng Chih. Ed. Dominic Cheung. Boston: Twayne, 1979; Modern Chinese Poetry. Ed. Julia Lin; The People Sing. More: Translations of Poems and Songs of the People of China. Ed. Rewi Alley; Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Ed. Kai-yu Hsu. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1963, 131-49.

"Much of Our Contemporary Poetry Seems Unimaginative in Its Thought Structure, Shallow in Feelings, Tedious, and Lacking in Intensity of Language." In Hualing Nieh, ed./tr. Literature of the Hundred Flowers. 2 vols. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, II: 37-38.


Fengzi
" The Portrait.” Tr. Ann Huss. In Amy D. Dooling, ed., Writing Women in Modern China The Revolutionary Years, 1936-1976. NY: Columbia UP, 2005, 207-22.


Feng Zikai 丰子恺
"Autumn" [Qiu]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 195-99.

"Bombs in Yishan." Tr. D. Pollard. Renditions 38 (Aut. 1992): 77-83. Also in Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 199-205.

"Eating Melon Seeds" [Chi guazi]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 189-95.


Fu Aimao
"Elope." In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia University Press, 2006, 155.


Fu Lin
"Stones in the Sea (Qing hai shi)." In The Sea of Regret: Two Turn of the Century Chinese Romantic Novels. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1995, 19-100.

[G]


Gan Tiesheng
"The Get-Together." [story]. In Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds./trs. Mao's Harvest: Voices from China's New Generation. NY: Oxford UP, 1983, 198-207.


Gao Dapeng
"Meditations in the August Sanctuary." Tr. Jane Parish Yang. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1982): 46-65.


Gao Ertai 高尔泰
In Search of My Homeland: Memoir of a Chinese Labor Camp. NY: Ecco Press, 2009.

"My Sister Lan's Specimen Book." Tr. H. Batt. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 90-95.

"Sunset Over Barren Mountains." Tr. Zhu Hong. Words Without Borders: The Online Magazine of International Literature.


Gao Fengge
"Paving the Way." In I Knew All Along and Other Stories By Contemporary Chinese Writers. Peking: Foregin Languages Press, 1960, 44-48.


Gao Jianqun 高建群
Tongwan City. Tr. Eric Mu. CN Times Books, 2013.

[Abstract: Sixteen centuries ago, the last chieftain of the Xiongnu sought to unite China by force. In Tongwan City, the warlord Helian Bobo orders that an impregnable city be built. This city will be the capital of an empire that unites China. Tongwancheng (unite all nations) or Tongwan City would be built with thick outer walls made with white clay and powdered rice, giving the city the appearance of a giant ship. Helian stops at nothing to build his city and his empire, drafting 100,000 Xiongnu. Will Helian Bobo’s Tongwancheng unite China under one ruler? Meanwhile, another great man is quietly laying the groundwork for a nation. Kumarajiva is brought to the Chinese court to begin teaching the precepts of Buddhism. He embarks on a career of teaching, and of translating the basic sutras into Chinese. As his influence begins to spread and his fame grows, the seeds of a unified China are sown. Twenty years ago, Gao Jianqun’s bestselling novel The Last Hun popularized ancient Chinese legend and renewed interest in early Chinese history and culture. In Tongwan City, Gao relates an epic saga of murder and compassion in the grassland kingdom of the ancient Chinese frontier, while telling a parallel story of knowledge blooming in the center of Chinese life. Gao weaves into this tale seminal themes of Chinese history and culture: the connection between the warlike Xiongnu and their cousins the Huns. And he tells of the Great Wall that was built to separate the Xiongnu from the Han Chinese, and the philosophy that ultimately united them.]


Gao Lanting
“Huaiyiwan—A Story of the North Shensi Guerillas.” Tr. W.J.F. Jenner. In W.J.F. Jenner, ed. Modern Chinese Stories. London: Oxford UP, 1970, 139-49.


Gao Xiaosheng 高晓声
The Broken Betrothal. Beijing: Panda, 1981.

"A Gift of Land." Tr. Howard Goldblatt. In Helen F. Siu, ed., Furrows: Peasants, Intellectuals, and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1990, 163-80.

"Invasion of the Grassy Pond." Trs. Ren Zhong and Yuzhi Yang. In Hometowns and Childhood. San Francisco: Long River Press, 2005, 105-108.

"Li Shunda Builds a House." In The New Realism. ed. Lee Yee. NY: Hippocrene, 1983, 31-55. Also, Tr. Madelyn Ross. In Mason Y.H. Wang, ed., Perspectives in Contemporary Chinese Literature. University Center, MI: Green River Press, 1983, 193-228. Also, in Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One's Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 3-27..

"Trusts of Violent Creativity: 'I Returned with My Hands Empty and Shame on My Face.'" Tr. Fung Mei-cheong. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 85-90.


Gao Xingjian 高行健
"The Accident."Tr. Mabel Lee. The New Yorker (June 2, 2003). Rpt. in Buying a Fishing Rod for My Father. NY: HarperCollins, 2004.

"The Aesthetics of Creation." Tr. Caroline Mason. China Perspectives 2 (2010): 47-52.

"Alarm Signal." In Shiao-Ling Yu, ed., Chinese Drama after the Cultural Revolution, 1979-1989. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 1996, 159-232.

Ballade Nocturne. Tr. (from French) Claire Conceison. Lewes, UK: Sylph Editions, 2010. [Cahiers Series (italics), American University of Paris.]

"Between Life and Death." Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fung. In The Other Shore: Plays by Gao Xingjian. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1999.

"The Bus Stop." In Shiao-Ling Yu, ed., Chinese Drama after the Cultural Revolution, 1979-1989. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 1996, 233-90. Also in Xiaomei Chen, ed., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama. NY: Columbia UP, 2010, 769-804.

"Bus Stop: A Lyrical Comedy on Life in One Act." Tr. Kimberley Besio. In Haiping Yan, ed., Theater and Society: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1998, 3-59.

"The Bus-stop" (partial). Tr. Geremie Barmé. Renditions 19/20 (1983): 373-86.

Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather. Tr. Mabel Lee. NY: HarperCollins, 2004. [comprised of "The Temple," "In the Park," "Cramp," "The Accident," "Buying a Fishing Rod for My Grandfather," and "In an Instant"]

"The Case for Literature: 2000 Nobel Literature Lecture."

The Case for Literature. Tr. Mabel Lee. London, Sydney, etc: Fourth Estate, 2006. [in addition to his Nobel Lecture, "The Case for Literaturre," the volume contains "The Modern Chinese Language and Literary Creation," "Without Isms," "The Voice of the Individual," "Another Kind of Theatre," "The Necessity of Loneliness," "Wilted Chrysanthemums," "About Fleeing," "Literature and Metaphysics: About Soul Mountain," "Cold Literature," "Literature as Testimony: The Search for Truth," "Author's Preface to Without Isms."]

Cold Literature: Selected Works by Gao Xingjian. Trs. Gilbert C. F. Fong and Mabel Lee. HK: Chinese University Press, 2005.

"Contemporary Technique and National Character in Fiction." Tr. Ng Mau-sang. Renditions 19/20 (1983): 55-58.

"Dialogue and Rebuttal." Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fung. In The Other Shore: Plays by Gao Xingjian. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1999.

Dialoguer/Interloquer. Tr. Gao Xingjian. Paris: Meet, 1994.

Escape and the Man Who Questions Death: Two Plays by Gao Xingjian. Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fong. HK: The Chinese University Press, 2007.

"Fugitives: A Modern Tragedy in Two Acts." Tr. Gregory Lee. In Gregory Lee, ed., Chinese Writing and Exile. Chicago: Center for East Asian Studies, The University of Chicago, 1993, 89-137.

Gao Xinjian: Aesthetics and Creation. Tr. Mabel Lee. Amherst, NY: Cambria, 2012. [MCLC Resource Center review by Kwok-kan Tam]

[Abstracts: The present collection takes the title Aesthetics and Creation from the name of the Chinese collection from which most of these essays are drawn, but it also includes some of Gao’s most recent unpublished essays. University of Sydney academic Mabel Lee is the translator, and the book also includes her authoritative introductory essay that contextualizes Gao’s significant position as an independent and uncompromising voice in the noisy hype of the globalized world of the present in which creative writers and artists are forced to conform with the demands of political and other group agendas, or with market forces, in order to survive. In incisive and cogently argued essays, he exposes the political dynamics of so-called “modernity” in Western literature and art, and how this has been enthusiastically embraced in China since the 1980s. In other essays he analyses traditional and modern European and Chinese notions of fiction, theatre and art, and elaborates on what aspects of writers and artists from both cultures have informed him in developing his own aesthetics in narration, performance and the visual arts. These essays testify to the extent of the cosmopolitanism of his aesthetics that both informs and are manifested in his literary and art creations. Gao Xingjian’s Aesthetics and Creation has importance and relevance to the general reader with an interest in literature and art as a creative human pursuit that is not demarcated by national or cultural boundaries. This book is both indispensable and inspiring reading for intellectuals and informed readers who regard themselves as citizens of the world. For academics, researchers, and students engaged in the disciplines of literature and visual art studies, world literature studies, comparative literature studies, performance studies, theatre studies, cultural studies, narrative fiction studies, and studies in the history of literature and the visual arts in modern times, this book is essential and thought-provoking reading that will have many positive outcomes.]

"Gao Xingjian tan wenxue chuangzuo" (Gao Xingjian discusses literary creativity). Transcript in Chinese of Gao's Lecture at City University of Hong Kong (January 31, 2001).

"Hiding From the Rain." Tr. Tsushiu Chiu. Studies on Asia Series II, 2, 1 (2005): 1-19. [pdf download]

"The Language of Exile: A Dialogue between Gao Xingjian and Yang Lian." Tr. Ben Carrdus. Yanglian.net.

"Leaving the Twentieth Century Behind: A Conversation between Gao Xingjian and Liu Zaifu." Tr. Caroline Mason. China Perspectives 3 (2008): 118-22.

"A Literary Journey." English translation of transcript of Gao's lecture at City University of Hong Kong (January 31, 2001).

"Literature as Testimony: The Search for Truth." Tr. Mabel Lee. Stockholm: Swedish Academy, 2001.

Nobel Laureate, Swedish Sinologist Speak (Video files of talks given in Mandarin at City University HK, Jan. 31, 2001).

"Nobel Lecture: The Case for Literature." Tr. Mabel Lee. Stockholm: Swedish Academy, 2000.

"Nocturnal Wanderer." Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fung. In The Other Shore: Plays by Gao Xingjian. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1999.

Of Mountains and Seas: A Tragicomedy of the Gods in Three Acts. Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fong. HK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2008.

One Man's Bible. Tr. Mabel Lee. New York: HarperCollins, 2002.

The Other Shore: Plays by Gao Xingjian. Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fong. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1999. [includes: The Other Shore (1986), Between Life and Death (1991), Dialogue and Rebuttal (1992), Nocturnal Wanderer (1993), and Weekend Quartet (1995)].

"The Other Shore." Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fung. In The Other Shore: Plays by Gao Xingjian. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1999.

"The Other Side." Tr. Jo Riley. In Martha Cheung and Jane Lai, eds., An Oxford Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. NY: Oxoford UP, 1997, 152-183.

Snow in August: Play by Gao Xingjian. Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fong. HK: The Chinese University Press, 2003.

Le Somnambule. French version by Gao Xingjian. Carnieres-Morlawelz, Belgium: Editions Lansman, 1995.

Soul Mountain. Tr. Mabel Lee. HarperCollins, 2000.

"The Voice of the Individual." Tr. Lena Aspfors and Torbjorn Loden. The Stockholm Journal of East Asian Studies 6 (1995): 71-81.

"Weekend Quartet." Tr. Gilbert C. F. Fung. In The Other Shore: Plays by Gao Xingjian. HK: The Chinese University Press, 1999.

"Wild Man, a Contemporary Chinese Spoken Drama." Tr. Bruno Roubicek. Asian Theatre Journal 7, 2 (1990).

"Without Isms." Trs. Winnie Lau, Deborah Sauviat, and Martin Williams. The Journal of the Oriental Society of Australia 27/28 (1995/96).


Gao Yang
Stories by Gao Yang: "Rekindled Love" and "Purple Jade Hairpin". Tr. Chan Sin-wai. HK: Chinese University Press, 1989.


Gao Yihan
"The Question of People's Rights in the Provincial Constitutions." Contemporary Chinese Thought (Special issue on Rights and Human Rights). 31, 1 (Fall 1999): 62-63.

"The State Is Not the Final End of Life." Contemporary Chinese Thought (Special issue on Rights and Human Rights). 31, 1 (Fall 1999): 58-61.


Gao Ying
"Dajee and Her Father." Tr. Tang Sheng. Chinese Literature 11 (1959): 20-40.

"In the Same Boat." Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Chinese Literature 11 (1963): 26-38.

"White-capped Waves." Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Chinese Literature 6 (1964): 17-31.


Gao Yubao
My Childhood. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1960; 1975.


Gao Yunlan
Annals of a Provincial Town. Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1959.


Ge Fei
"A Date in Purple Bamboo Park." The Mystified Boat and Other New Stories from China. Eds. Frank Stewart and Herbert J. Batt. Special issue of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing 15, 2 (Winter 2003). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1-7.

"Encounter."Tr. Herbert Batt. In Batt, ed., Tales of Tibet: Sky Burials, Prayer Wheels, and Wind Horses. Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 77-104.

"Green Yellow." Tr. Eva Shan Chou. In Jing Wang, ed., China's Avant-garde Fiction. Durham: Duke UP, 1998, 23-42.

"The Lost Boat." Tr. Caroline Mason. In Henry Zhao, ed., The Lost Boat: Avant-garde Fiction from China. London: Wellsweep, 1993, 77-100.

"Meetings." Tr. Deborah Mills. In Henry Zhao and John Cayley, eds., Abandoned Wine: Chinese Writing from Today, 2. London: Wellsweep, 1996, 15-49.

"The Mystified Boat." The Mystified Boat and Other New Stories from China. Eds. Frank Stewart and Herbert J. Batt. Special issue of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing 15, 2 (Winter 2003). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 142-61.

"Remembering Mr. Wu You." Tr. Howard Goldblatt. In Goldblatt, ed., Chairman Mao Would Not Be Amused: Fiction from Today's China. NY: Grove Press, 1995, 236-43. Rpt. in Jing Wang, ed., China's Avant-garde Fiction. Durham: Duke UP, 1998, 15-22.

"Whistling." Tr. Victor Mair. In Jing Wang, ed., China's Avant-garde Fiction. Durham: Duke UP, 1998, 43-68.


Genzi
"Two Poems." Tr. Nick Admussen. Renditions 74 (Autumn 2010): 40-59.


Geyang
"An Old Nun Tells Her Story." Tr. Herbert Batt. In Batt, ed., Tales of Tibet: Sky Burials, Prayer Wheels, and Wind Horses. Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 163-76.


Gong Liu
Poems in: Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 221-25.


Gong Shaodong
“Friendship in Late Years.” Tr. Li Guoqing. Chinese Literature (Summer 1993): 76-85.


Gong Sunyan
"Drifting Clouds." Tr. Nancy Ing. In Nancy Ing, ed., Ivory Balls and Other Stories. Taipei: Meiya, 1970, 55-73. First Published in Orient/West, 8.2 (1963): 29-36.


Gu Cheng
"'The Aimless I': An Interview with Gu Cheng" (Meiyou mudi de wo"Gu Cheng fangtan lu/Interview of Gu Cheng by Suizi Zhang-Kubin). Tr. Li Xia. In Essays, Interviews, Recollections and Unpublished Material of Gu Cheng, Twenthieth Century Chinese Poet: The Poetics of Death. Lewiston, NY: Mellen Press, 1999, 335-340.

"Brief Stop" [Zhan ting]. Tr. W. J. F. Jenner. In Perry Link, ed., Stubborn Weeds: Popular and Controversial Chinese Literature after the Cultural Revolution. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983, 1854

"Cremation" (Huozang). Tr. Stephen Haven and Wang Shouyi. Two Lines: A Journal of Translation (1999).

"Curves" [Huxian]. Tr. William Tay. In Perry Link, ed., Stubborn Weeds: Popular and Controversial Chinese Literature after the Cultural Revolution. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983, 185.

"Far and Near." Trs. Gordon T. Osing and De-An Wu Swihart. Salt Hill 5 (1998).

"Feeling" [Ganjue]. Tr. William Tay. In Perry Link, ed., Stubborn Weeds: Popular and Controversial Chinese Literature after the Cultural Revolution. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983, 185.

"From Walled Dreams, and an Awakening." Tr. Joseph R. Allen. Words Without Borders: The Online Magazine of International Literature.

"Good-bye." Trs. Gordon T. Osing and De-An Wu Swihart. Salt Hill 5 (1998).

"In Sunset's Glow." Trs. Gordon T. Osing and De-An Wu Swihart. Salt Hill 5 (1998).

"In the Twinkling of the Eyes." Trs. Gordon T. Osing and De-An Wu Swihart. Salt Hill 5 (1998).

Nameless Flowers: Selected Poems of Gu Cheng. Tr. Aaron Crippen, with photographs by Hai Bo. NY: George Brazilier, 2005.

"On the Nature of Feminine Purity in A Dream of Red Mansions and Goethe's Faust." Marian Galik Interviews Gu Cheng in Berlin, April 24, 1992 (Fushide. Hongloumeng. Nu'erxing). Trs. Li Xia and Marian Galik. In Essays, Interviews, Recollections and Unpublished Material of Gu Cheng, Twenthieth Century Chinese Poet: The Poetics of Death. Lewiston, NY: Mellen Press, 1999, 349-361.

"The Origins of the Moon and Stars." Trs. Gordon T. Osing and De-An Wu Swihart. Salt Hill 5 (1998).

Poems, in Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds./trs. Mao's Harvest: Voices from China's New Generation. NY: Oxford UP, 1983, 16-18 ["A Generation," "Shooting a Photograph," "I Am a Willful Child"] and 178-79 ["The Two Realms of Love," "Epigraph"]

"Question and Answers" (Dasuowen; Gu Cheng on Chinese poetry). Tr. Li Xia. In Essays, Interviews, Recollections and Unpublished Material of Gu Cheng, Twenthieth Century Chinese Poet: The Poetics of Death. Lewiston, NY: Mellen Press, 1999, 341-347.

Sea of Dreams: The Selected Writings of Gu Cheng. Tr. with introduction by Joseph R. Allen. NY: New Directions, 2005.

Selected Poems. Trs. Sean Golden and Chu Chiyu. HK: Chinese University of HK, 1990.

"This Generation." Trs. Gordon T. Osing and De-An Wu Swihart. Salt Hill 5 (1998).

"A Whole Generation" [Yi dai ren]. Tr. William Tay. In Perry Link, ed., Stubborn Weeds: Popular and Controversial Chinese Literature after the Cultural Revolution. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1983, 185.

(and Lei Mi) Ying'er, The Kingdom of Daughters. Tr. Li Xia. Dortmund: Projekt Verlag, 1995.


Gu Gong
"A Discussion Arising from Not Understanding Poetry." [essay]. In Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds./trs. Mao's Harvest: Voices from China's New Generation. NY: Oxford UP, 1983, 9-16.


Gu Hongming
The Spirit of Chinese Civilization. Taibei: 1970 reprint of 1915 original.


Gu Hua
"The 'Green Whirlwind'." Chinese Literature 9 (1972): 74-87.

"The Ivy-Covered Cabin." Tr. Tam King-fai. In Helen Siu, ed. Furrows, Peasants, Intellectuals and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Stanford: SUP, 1990, 181-206.

Pagoda Ridge and Other Stories. Tr. Gladys Yang. Beijing: Chinese Literature, 1985.

A Small Town Called Hibiscus. Beijing: Panda Books, 1983.

"The Sieve." Tr. Yu Fanqin. Chinese Literature (Summer, 1988): 3-10.

"The Slow Maturation of My Craft: Tea in Cold Water Steeps Slowly." Tr. Linda Greenhouse Wang. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 92-98.

Virgin Widows. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. Honolulu: U. of Hawaii Press, 1996.


Gu Huilong
"Puppeteer Ah-Chun." Tr. Cheng Jun-mei. The Chinese Pen (Winter, 1981): 1-29.


Gu Long
The Eleventh Son: A Novel of Martial Arts and Tangled Love. Paramus, NJ: Homa and Sekey Books, 2005.


Gu Sifan
The Peach Blossom Fan. Tr. T. L. Yang. HK: Hong Kong UP, 1998. [this novel, based on the Ming play, was first published in Taiwan in 1948]


Gu Xiaoyang
"Truant Days." Tr. Duncan Hewitt. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 126-31.


Gu Zhaosen
"Husband and Wife." Tr. Ying-tsih Hwang. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1988): 61-77.

"Ming-te Wang." Tr. Ying-tsih Hwang. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1988): 1-24.

"Plain Moon." Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1992): 145-75. Also in David Der-wei Wang, ed., Running Wild: New Chinese Writers. NY: Columbia UP, 1994, 137-57.

"To Be Continued." Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1991): 1-21.


Guan Guan (Kuan Kuan or Kwan Kwan)
Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 113-16.

"Four Poems by Kwan Kwan." Tr. John J.S. Balcom. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1990): 41-48. .


Guo Cheng (Kuo Cheng)
"Un loup en cavale." Tr. Olivier Bialais. In Angel Pino and Issabelle Rabut, eds., A mes frères du village de garrison: Anthologie de nouvelles taiwanaises contemporaines. Paris: Blue de China, 2001, 155-71.


Guo Lianghui
"In the Middle of the Night." Tr. John McLellan. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1977): 71-117.

Taipei Women. Tr. Constantine Tung and ed. by Theresa Wang. HK, Taipei: KLH New Enterprise Co., 1983.


Guo Moruo
Autobiographie: mes années d'enfance. Tr. P. Ryckmans. Paris: Gallimard, 1970.

"The Champions of Chi" (Qi yongshi bi wu). Tr. G.I. Begley. Eastern World 3, 9 (1949): 28-29.

"Cho Wen-chun." In Harold Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1974, 45-67.

Chu Yuan: A Play in Five Acts. Trs. Yang Hsien-yi and Gladys Yang. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1978.

"The Dilemma" (Shizi jia). In Edgar Snow, ed. Living China. New York: Reynal and Hitchcock, 1937.

"Double Performance." Tr. W.J.F. Jenner. In Jenner, ed., Modern Chinese Stories. London: Oxford University Press, 1970, 69-74.

"La passe du ravin encaisse" (Hangu guan). Tr. P. Demieville. In Etienne Balazs ed., Aspects de la Chine. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1962, 630-35.

"Marx Enters the Confucian Temple." Trs. Timothy Wixted and Matthew Finkbeiner. Renditions 51 (1999): 77-86.

"Nirvana of the Feng and Huang." Chinese Literature website.

"Oh, Earth, My Mother." Chinese Literature website.

"On Nationalizing and Popularizing Poetry." Tr. Kai-yu Hsu. In Hsu, ed. The Chinese Literary Scene: A Writers' Visit to the People's Republic. NY: Vintage Books, 1975, 32-35.

"On the Problems of Poetry." In Hualing Nieh, ed./tr. Literature of the Hundred Flowers. 2 vols. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, II: 30-36.

Poems in: Modern Chinese Poetry. Ed. Julia Lin; The People Speak Out. Translations of Poems and Songs of the People of China. Ed. Rewi Alley; Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Ed. Kai-yu Hsu. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1963, 26-39.

"Preface to The Sorrows of Young Werther." Tr. Kirk A. Denton. In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 204-212.

"Rebirth of the Goddesses." Chinese Literature website.

The Resurrection of Fêng-Huang. Trs. Harold Acton and Ch’en Shih-Hsiang. [Music by] Robert Sherlaw Johnson. London, Oxford University Press, 1972.

"The Return of the Master." Trs. B. Krebsova and R. Samsour. New Orient 1, 6 (1960): 22-24.

“Romanticism and Realism.” In Meserve and Meserve, eds., Modern Literature from China. NY: New York UP, 1974, 315-24.

Selected Poems from The Goddesses. Trs. John Lester and A. C. Barnes. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1958, 1978.

Selected Works of Guo Moruo: Five Historical Plays. Tr. Bonnie McDougall, et. al. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1984. ["Qu Yuan," "Cai Wenji," "The Tiger Tally," "Twin Flower," and "Wu Zetian"]

“The Struggle for the Creation of New China’s Literature.” The People’s New Literature: Four Reports at the First All-China Conference of Writers and Artists. Beijing: Cultural Press, 1950, 41-56.

"Under the Moonlight" (Yueguang xia). In Chi-chen Wang, ed., Stories of China at War. NY: Columbia UP, 1947, 152-58.

"Wang Zhaojun--Act II" (1923). Tr. Tommy McClellan. Renditions 59-60 (Nov. 2003): 199-209 [includes synopsis of Act I and introduction by Eva Hong].


Guo Qiangsheng
"He Is My Brother." Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1991): 1-28.


Guo Shixing
"Birdmen: A Drama in Three Acts." Tr. Jane Lai. In Martha Cheung and Jane Lai, eds., An Anthology of Contemporary Drama. NY: Oxford UP, 1997, 295-350.


Guo Songfen
Running Mother and Other Stories. Tr . John Balcolm. NY: Columbia UP, 2008. [MCLC Resource Center book review by Chien-hsin Tsai]

[Guo Songfen's short stories are masterful psychological portraits that play with the echoes of history and the nature of identity. One of the few modernists to truly capture the fallout from such events as the February 28th Incident and the White Terror, Guo Songfen illuminates the quiet core of his characters through a spare and immediate style that is at once a symptom and an allegory of the trauma in which they live--CUP blurb]


Guo Xiaolu
Village of Stone. Tr. Cindy Carter. London: Chatto and Windus, 2004. Reprint: New York: Vintage, 2005.

[Abstract: Coral and her slacker boyfriend live on the ground floor of a tower block in twenty-first century China. One day, someone sends her a dried eel through the post. As the smell of the sea floods her small flat, she is transported back to the fishing village where she grew up, the Village of Stone she has tried so hard to forget. This haunting and beautiful novel tells the story of one little girl's struggle to build a life for herself against all odds. At the same time, it is an incisive portrait of China's new urban youth, who have hidden behind their modern lifestyle all the poverty and cruelty of their past.]

A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers. London: Chatto and Windus, 2007.

Twenty Fragments of a Ravenous Youth. Trs. Rebecca Morris and Pamela Casey. London: Chatto and Windus, 2008.


Guo Xuebo
The Desert Wolf. Panda Books, 1996.

"The Sand Fox." Tr. Yu Fanqin. Chinese Literature (Winter, 1987): 108-23.


Guo Zheng
"King of the Pool Players." Tr. Ying-tsih Hwang. The Chinese Pen (Summer, 1991): 25-53.

[H]


Hai Xin
"Night Revels." tr. Gu Yaxing. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 305-310.


Hai Ying
"Outsized Feet." Tr. K.C. Tu and Robert Backus. Taiwan Literature English Translation Series 5 (1999): 71-72.


Haizi (or Hai Zi)
An English Translation of Poems of the Contemporary Chinese Poet Hai Zi. Tr. Hong Zeng, Lewiston / Queenston / Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press, 2005.

"Dunhuang." Tr. Ye Chun. Cerise Press 1, 1 (2009).

Over Autumn Rooftops. Tr. Dan Murphy. NY: Host Publications, 2010. [MCLC Resource Center review by Michelle Yeh]

"Poetry Book." Tr. Ye Chun. Cerise Press 1, 1 (2009).

"Song: Light Strikes the Ground." Tr. Ye Chun. Cerise Press 1, 1 (2009).

"Wine Cup: A Bouquet of Love Poems. Tr. Ye Chun. Cerise Press 1, 1 (2009).


Han Bangqing
The Sing-Song Girls of Shanghai. Trs. Eileen Chang and Eva Hung. NY: Columbia UP, 2005. [CUP abstract]


Han Chunxu
"Rejecting Fate." Tr. Diana B. Kingsbury. In I Wish I Were a Wolf: The New Voice in Chinese Women's Literature. Beijing: New World Press, 1994, 235-47.


Han Dong 韩东
Banished! A Novel. Tr. Nicky Harman. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2008. [MCLC Resource Center review by Mingwei Song]

[Blurb: It is 1969 and China is in the throes of the Cultural Revolution. The Tao family is banished to the countryside, forced to leave comfortable lives in Nanjing to be reeducated in the true nature of the revolution by the peasants of Sanyu village. The parents face exile with stoicism and teach their son to embrace reeducation wholeheartedly. Is this simple pragmatism, an attempt to protect the boy and ensure his future? Or do the banished cadres really cling to their belief in their leaders and the ideals of the Revolution? These questions remain tantalizingly unanswered in this prize-winning first novel.]

"The Duck Prophet." Tr. Yanbing Chen. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald, eds., Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 281.

"Four Poems." Tr. Nicky Harman. Renditions 74 (Autumn 2010): 60-66.

"Five Poems." Trs. Tony Prince and Tao Naikan. Renditions 57 (2002): 112-121.

"Learning to Write with a Brush." Tr. Michael Day. PRISM International (Vancouver) 36, 3 (Spring 1998).

"Love Song," "Essay Fragment." Tr. Nicholas Kaldis. Dirty Goat 24 (2011): 181-83.

"Mourning the Cat." Tr. Yanbing Chen. In Henry Y. H. Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 280.

A Phone Call from Dalian: Selected Poems of Han Dong. Ed and Tr. by Nicky Harman, with contributions from Maghiel van Crevel, Michael Day, Tao Naikan, Tony Prince, and Yu Yan Chen. Introduction by Maghiel van Crevel. Brookline, MA : Zephyr Press, 2011.

"Someone in a Riot of Stones, There Is a Darkness, Mountain People, Of the Wild Goose Pagoda, A Phone Call from Dalian, Gregorian Chant, Night Flight." Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 2 (2012): 180-85.

"Taking Advantage." Tr. Desmond Skeel. In Henry Y. H. Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald, eds., Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 183-211.

"Your Hand," "Grey," "O." Trs. George O'Connell and Diana Shi. Atlanta Review xiv, 2 (Spring/Summer 2008): 61-63.


Han Han 韩寒
The Generation: Dispatches from China's Most Popular Literary Star (and Race Car Driver). Tr. Alan Barr. NY: Simon and Schuster, 2012.

[Abstract: For those who follow Chinese affairs, Han Han is as controversial as they come—an irreverent singer, sports celebrity, and satirist whose brilliant blogs and books have made him a huge celebrity with more than half a billion readers. Now, with this collection of his essays, Americans can appreciate the range of this rising literary star and get a fascinating trip through Chinese culture. This Generation gathers his essays and blogs dating from 2006 to the present, telling the story of modern China through Han Han’s unique perspective. Writing on topics as diverse as racing, relationships, the Beijing Olympics, and how to be a patriot, he offers a brief, funny, and illuminating trip through a complex nation that most Westerners view as marching in lockstep. As much a millennial time capsule as an entertaining and invaluable way for English readers to understand our rising Eastern partner and rival, This Generation introduces a dazzling talent to American shores.]


Han Hsiu (Buczaki, Teresa)
"Upstairs, Downstairs." Tr. Lily Liu. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1992): 26-45.


Han Shaogong 韓少功
"After the 'Literature of the Wounded': Local Cultures, Roots, Maturity, and Fatigue." Tr. David Wakefield. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 148-55.

"Blue Bottlecap." Tr. Michael S. Duke. In Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 3-12.

Bruits dans la montagne et autres nouvelles. Tr. Annie Curien. Paris: Gallimard, 2000.

"Deaf Mute and his Old Suona." Chinese Literature 1 (1983.): 7-33.

"Deja Vu." Tr. Margaret Decker. In Helen Siu, ed. Furrows, Peasants, Intellectuals and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Stanford: SUP, 1990, 223-37.

A Dictionary of Maqiao. Tr. Julia Lovell. New York: Columbia UP, 2003.

"Embers." Tr. Thomas Moran. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 263-79.

"Flames" (Huoyan). Tr. Simon Patton. Two Lines: A Journal of Translation (1999).

Homecoming? and Other Stories. HK: Renditions, 1992. [includes "Homecoming," "The Blue Bottle-cap," "Pa Pa Pa," "Woman, Woman, Woman"]

"The Homecoming". Tr. Jeanne Tai. In Tai, ed., Spring Bamboo: A Collection of Contemporary Chinese Short Stories. NY: Random House, 1989, 19-40. Also in Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One's Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 126-42..

"The Leader's Demise". In Joseph Lau, Howard Goldblatt, eds. The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia UP., 1995, 387-98.

"Legacy of a Laugh." Chinese Literature (Spring 1995): 171-177.

"Old Acquaintance." Tr. Long Xu. In Long Xu, ed., Recent Fiction From China 1987-1988: Selected Stories and Novellas. Lewiston: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1991, 55-64.

Pa, Pa, Pa (French). Tr. Noel Dutrait and Hu Sishe. Aix-en-Provence: Alinea, 1990.

"The Return." Chinese Literature 2 (1989): 29-44.

Seduction (French). Tr. Annie Curien. Paris: Philippe Picquier, 1990.

"Why Did the Cultural Revolution End?" boundary 2 35, 2 (2008): 93-106.


Han Song 韩松
"The Last Subway." Tr. Joel Martinsen. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 117-32.

"The Passenger and the Creator." Tr. Nathaniel Isaacson. Renditions 77/78 (Spring/Autumn 2012): 144-72.


Han Xiaohui
"Gender Roles in Commercials." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 51-54.

"I Don't Want to Be a Woman." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 55-61.

"Three Autumnal Phases in a Day." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 63-73.

"Women Don't Cry." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 75-78.


Hang Cheng
New Youth. Trs. Jonathan Noble. MCLC Resource Center Publications, 2006.


Hao Ran
"Aunt Hou's Courtyard." Tr. Kate Sears. In Helen Siu, ed., Furrows--Peasants, Intellectuals, and the State: Stories and Histories From Modern China. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1990, 147-55.

Bright Clouds. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1974.

"The Bright Road." Chinese Literature 9 (1975): 4-66.; 10 (1975): 4-59.

The Call of the Fledglings and Other Children's Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1974.

"Date Orchard." Chinese Literature 4 (1974): 36-48.

"Debut." Tr. Wong Kam-ming. Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars 8, 2 (1976): 24-29.

"The Eve of Her Wedding." Tr. Gladys Yang. Chinese Literature 6 (1965): 20-33.

"Firm and Impartial." Tr. Kate Sears. In Helen Siu, ed. Furrows, Peasants, Intellectuals and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Stanford: SUP, 1990, 147-55.

"First and Last." Chinese Literature 12 (1973): 3-21.

The Golden Road: A Story of One Village in the Uncertain Days After Land Reforms. Tr. Carma Hinton and Chris Gilmartin. Beijing, 1981.

"A Happy Life and the Art of Writing." Tr. Tam King-fai. In Helen Siu, ed., Furrows, Peasants, Intellectuals and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Stanford: SUP, 1990, 293-96.

Little Pebble is Missing. HK: Chao Yang Publishing Company, 1973.

"Moonlight in the Eastern Wall." Tr Yu Fan-chin. Chinese Literature 11 (1959): 41-49.

"A Sea of Happiness." Chinese Literature 1 (1975): 3-52.

"Sisters-in-law." Tr. Gladys Yang. Chinese Literature 2 (1965): 48-60.

"Sons and Daughters of Hsisha." Excerpts in Chinese Literature 10 (1974): 3-66.

"Spring Rain." Tr. Sidney Shapiro. Chinese Literature 8 (1964): 3-16.

"The Stockman." [excerpts from The Sun Shines Bright] Chinese Literature 3 (1972): 3-48.

"Two Buckets of Water." Chinese Literature 4 (1974): 23-35.

"The Vegetable Seeds." Tr. Zhang Su. Chinese Literature 6 (1966): 3-12.

"Writing--for Whom?" China Reconstructs (May 1972): 14-17.

"A Young Hopeful." Chinese Literature 5 (1973): 45-56.


He An
"Andante." Tr. Patricia Sieber. In Patricia Sieber, ed., Red Is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex between Women, Collected Stories. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 169-81.


He Gutian
"Land of Snow." In Harold Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1974, 405-25.


He Guyan
“Maple Leaves.” Tr. W.J.F. Jenner. In W.J.F. Jenner, ed. Modern Chinese Stories. London: Oxford UP, 1970, 209-29.


He Haiming 何海鸣
"For the Love of Her Feet." Tr. Timothy C. Wong. In Wong, Stories for Saturday: Twentieth Century Chinese Popular Fiction. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 61-72.


He Jiping
"The First House of Beijing Duck." In Shiao-Ling Yu, ed., Chinese Drama after the Cultural Revolution, 1979-1989. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 1996, 423-88.

"The World's Top Restaurant." Tr. Edward Gunn. In Xiaomei Chen, ed., Reading the Right Text: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2003, 134-222.


He Jiahong 何家弘
Crimes et délits à la bourse de Pékin. La quatrième enquête de Maître Hong. Paris: Editions de l'aube, 2005.

Crime du sang [Feng nu]. Tr. Marie-Claude Cantournet. Paris: Edition de l'Aube, 2011

L'Enigme de la pierre oeil de dragon [Longyan shi zhi mi]. Tr. Marie-Claude Cantournet. Paris: Edition de l'Aube, .2003.

Hanging Devils. Tr. Duncan Hewitt. Penguin, 2012.

[Abstract: When Hong Jun returns to China from studying and working as a lawyer in the US, he opens the doors to his new practice in Beijing intent on helping ordinary people defend their rights, but he soon finds himself embroiled in a case which is anything but ordinary. Ten years earlier, in 1984, on a state farm in the brutally icy, rural northeast of China, local beauty Li Hongmei was raped and murdered. There were two suspects and whilst one disappeared, the other confessed making it a seemingly open and shut case. But now it looks like the wrong man may have been sent down for the crime. His newly-rich brother is prepared to pay whatever it takes to clear his name and he thinks Hong Jun is the right man for the job. In a quest for justice, Hong Jun returns to the sins of the past and delves deep into the sleazy underbelly of China's corrupt legal system. When he stumbles upon what appears to be official complicity in a cover-up he must challenge those who hold the rule of law secondary to personal ambition and the whims of local officials to solve a case shrouded in both mystery and treachery and one that ambiguously alludes to the ancient legends of the Heilongjiang Mountains where the murder took place.]

Les Mysterieux tableuax ancien [Shenmi de guhua]. Tr. Marie-Claude Cantournet. Paris: Edition de l'Aube, 2002.


He Jingzhi 贺敬之
"Return to Yenan." Tr. Kai-yu Hsu. In Hsu, ed. The Chinese Literary Scene: A Writers' Visit to the People's Republic. NY: Vintage Books, 1975, 184-87.

The White-haired Girl: An Opera in Five Acts. With Ding Yi. Tr. Hsien-yi Yang and Gladys Yang. Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1954.


He Li
"Modernism and China: A Summary from the People's Daily." Tr. Geremie Barme. Renditions 19/20 (1983): 44-54.


He Qifang 何其芳
"Elegy" [Aige]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 271-75.

"Elegy." Tr. Canaan R. O. Morse. The Kenyon Review (Summer 2010).

Poems in:

Contemporary Chinese Poetry. Ed. Robert Payne. London, Routledge, 1947.

Paths in Dreams: Selected Prose and Poetry of Ho Ch'i-fang. Ed. and Tr. Bonnie S. McDougall. St. Lucia, Queensland: University of Queensland Press, 1976.

Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry. Ed. Kai-yu Hsu. Anchor Books, 1964.

Anothology of Modern Chinese Poetry. Ed/tr. Michelle Yeh. New Haven: Yale UP, 1992, 60-66.

"Clouds." Tr. Bonnie McDougall. Stand (Newcastle) 15, 3 (1974).

Paths in Dreams: Selected Prose and Poetry of Ho Ch'i-Fang. Tr. Bonnie McDougall. St. Lucia, Queensland: University of Queensland Press, 1976.

"Streets." Tr. Canaan Morse. Chinese Literature Today (Summer 2010): 76-79.

"The Weeping Yangtze." Tr. Canaan Morse. Chinese Literature Today (Summer 2010): 71-75.


He Wei
"My Old House in Shanghai." Trs. Ren Zhong and Yuzhi Yang. In Hometowns and Childhood. San Francisco: Long River Press, 2005, 69-80.


He Weiping
"Returning Home on a Stormy Night." In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia University Press, 2006, 45-46.


He Xiangning
Soaring: Poems of Liao Chung-k'ai and Ho Hsiang-ning. Tr. Wen-yee Ma. HK: Joint Publishing, 1980.


He Xin
"On Superfluous People." In G. Barme, ed., New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 260-64.

"What's New: A Letter from He Xin." In Geremie Barme, ed., New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices. NY: Times Books, 1992, 408-09.


He Zhen (He-Yin Zhen) 何震
The Birth of Chinese Feminism: Essential Texts in Transnational Theory. Eds. Lydia H. Liu, Rebecca E. Karl, and Dorothy Ko. NY: Columbia University Press, 2013.

[Abstract: He-Yin Zhen (ca. 1884-1920?) was a theorist who figured centrally in the birth of Chinese feminism. Unlike her contemporaries, she was concerned less with China’s fate as a nation and more with the relationship among patriarchy, imperialism, capitalism, and gender subjugation as global historical problems. This volume, the first translation and study of He-Yin’s work in English, critically reconstructs early twentieth-century Chinese feminist thought in a transnational context by juxtaposing He-Yin Zhen’s writing against works by two better-known male interlocutors of her time. The editors begin with a detailed analysis of He-Yin Zhen’s life and thought. They then present annotated translations of six of her major essays, as well as two foundational tracts by her male contemporaries, Jin Tianhe (1874-1947) and Liang Qichao (1873–1929), to which He-Yin’s work responds and with which it engages. Jin, a poet and educator, and Liang, a philosopher and journalist, understood feminism as a paternalistic cause that liberals like themselves should defend. He-Yin presents an alternative conception that draws upon anarchism and other radical trends. Ahead of her time, He-Yin Zhen complicates conventional accounts of feminism and China’s history, offering original perspectives on sex, gender, labor, and power that remain relevant today.]


He Zhong
Poems in New Generation: Poems from China Today. Ed. Wang Ping. Brooklyn, NY: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 49-62.


Hei Dachun
The Songs of Geese ... Or Of the Travellings of Men. Tr. Michael Day. Peterborough, UK: Spectacular Diseases, 1996.


Hei Ying
"When Spring Arrives." Tr. May-lee Chai. Modern Chinese Literature 9, 1 (Spring 1995): 31-38.


Heng Chen
Blackjack. Taipei: Unitas, 1994. [Set in Las Vages gambling casinos]


Hong Feng
"The Stream of Life." Tr. Michael Day. In Michael S. Duke, ed., Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction, 63-75.


Hong Ling
"Fever." Tr. Paola Zamperini. In Patricia Sieber, ed., Red Is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex between Women, Collected Stories. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 149-52.

“Poem from the Glass Womb.” Tr. Fran Martin. In Martin, ed., Angelwings: Contemporary Queer Fiction from Taiwan. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 189-212.


Hong Shen 洪深
"The Wedded Husband." Poet Lore 32, 1 (Spring 1921). [written in English]

"Yama Chao" (Zhao Yanwang). Tr. Carolyn Brown. In E. Gunn, ed., Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 10-40. Also in Xiaomei Chen, ed., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama. NY: Columbia UP, 2010, 66-96.


Hong Xingfu
"Dark Face Kieng-ah." Tr. Hwang Ying-tsih. The Chinese Pen (Spring, 1980): 1-26.

"My Land." Tr. Cathy Chiu. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 4 (1999): 23-50.

"The Play's Over." Tr. Michael Duke. The Chinese Pen (Spring, 1980): 55-89.


Hong Ying 虹影
"Bridge." Tr. John Cayley. In Under-Sky Underground. London: Wellsweeep, 1994, 80.

"The Bridge with a Secret." Trs. Herbert Batt and Henry Zhao. In A Lip Stick Called Red Pepper, Fiction About Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Bochum: Ruhr-University Press, 1999, 19-28.

"Butterfly and Butterfly." Tr. Henry Y.H. Zhao. In Abandoned Wine. London: Wellsweep, 1996, 184.

"Carnation Club." Tr. Desmond Skeel. In A Lip Stick Called Red Pepper, Fiction About Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Bochum: Ruhr-University Press, 1999, 88-151.

The Concubine of Shanghai. London: Marion Boyars, 2008.

Daughter of the River. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. London: Bloomsbury, 1998.

"The Dirty Finger on the Bottle Lid." Tr. Jenny Putin. Trafika 5 (Autumn 1995): 170-79. Also in A Lip Stick Called Red Pepper, Fiction About Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Bochum: Ruhr-University Press, 1999, 29-41.

"The Field." Tr. Susan McFadden. In Howard Goldblatt ed., Chairman Mao Would Not Be Amused: Fiction from Today's China. NY: Grove Press, 1995, 18-24.

"Fluttering." Tr. Janine Nicole. In A Lip Stick Called Red Pepper, Fiction About Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Bochum: Ruhr-University Press, 1999, 42-47.

"Gas." Tr. Henry Y.H. Zhao. In Abandoned Wine. London: Wellsweep, 1996, 144-45.

"The Green Peach." Tr. Henry Y.H. Zhao. In Abandoned Wine. London: Wellsweep, 1996, 142-43.

"How to Become a Fish." Tr. John Cayley. In Under-Sky Underground. London: Wellsweeep, 1994, 80.

K: The Art of Love. Trs. Henry Zhao and Nicky Harman. Marion Boyars, 2002.

A Lipstick Called Red Pepper: Fiction about Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Compiled by Henry Zhao. Trs, Herbert Batt, Janine Nicol, Jenny Putin, Desmond Skeel, Henry Zhao.
Bochum: Ruhr University Press, 1999.

"Little Sixth the Orphan." Tr. Janine Nicole. In A Lip Stick Called Red Pepper, Fiction About Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Bochum: Ruhr-University Press, 1999, 48-53.

Peacock Cries at the Three Gorges. Trs. Marks Smith and Henry Zhao. London: Marion Boyars, 2004.

"Preparing His Biography." Tr. John Cayley. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 57.

"Recent Research on Yu Hong." Tr. Desmond Skeel. In A Lip Stick Called Red Pepper, Fiction About Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Bochum: Ruhr-University Press, 1999, 54-73. Also in Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 224-43.

"The Saddled Deer." Tr. Herbert Batt and Henry Zhao. In A Lip Stick Called Red Pepper, Fiction About Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Bochum: Ruhr-University Press, 1999, 75-87. Also in The Mystified Boat and Other New Stories from China. Eds. Frank Stewart and Herbert J. Batt. Special issue of Manoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing 15, 2 (Winter 2003). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 29-56.

"The Snuff Bottle." Tr Jenny Putin. In A Lip Stick Called Red Pepper, Fiction About Gay and Lesbian Love in China. Bochum: Ruhr-University Press, 1999, 1-18. Also in Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 148-67.

Summer of Betrayal. Tr. Martha Avery. NY: Farrar Straus and Giroux, 1997; London: Bloomsbury, 1997.

"Winter Horror." Tr. Henry Y.H. Zhao. In Abandoned Wine. London: Wellsweep, 1996, 183.


Hou Ma
"Bloodsucking Rapture," and "A Wolf? In Sheep's Clothing?" Tr Canaan Morse. "Subway," and "Li Hong's Kiss." Trs. Hai An and Denis Mair. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 1 (2011): 119-20.


Hou Zhongsheng
"Fireside Chat." In Nieh Hua-ling, ed. and tr., Eight Stories By Chinese Women. Taipei: Heritage Press, 1962, 115-28.


Hou Zhen
"Three Years of Carefree Happiness." Tr. David Steelman. In Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 121-36. Also in The Chinese Pen (Summer 1975): 23-32.


Hu Dong
"Bodhidharma Hesitates on the Banks of the Yellow River," "Curing a Cough." Tr. Nicholas Kaldis. Dirty Goat 24 (March 2011): 176-79.

"The Death of Zilu." Tr. Jenny Putin. In Henry Y.H. Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald, eds., Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 64-89.

"From the Sorcerer's Book." Tr. Yanbing Chen. In Henry Y.H. Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald, eds., Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 167-69.


Hu Fayun 胡发云
"Chapter 51." Ruyan@sars.come. EastSouthWestNorth.

Such Is This World@sars.come. Tr. A. E. Clark. Dobbs Ferry, NY: Ragged Banner Press, 2011. [MCLC Resource Center Publications review by Brian Bernards] [response to Bernards' review by A. E. Clark]


Hu Fang
Garden of Mirrored Flowers. Tr. Melissa Lim. Berlin: Sternberg Press; Guangzhou: Vitamin Creative Space, 2010.

[Abstract: Fang's novel tells the story of a man in the process of designing a theme park, called Garden of Mirrored Flowers, and is an adaptation and transformation of the classical Chinese novel Jin Hua Yuan, or Flowers in the Mirror, from the Qing Dynasty. Beginning as a pictorial journey through myriad advertisements and the way they allow for many different entries into reality, Fang depicts parallels between the park's actual construction and how it has been imagined, or how it has evolved out of history. For Garden of Mirrored Flowers is less the vision of one author (Fang) and more the result of reality writing itself through this author; that is, a script, or documentary, of life. "It's a book," Fang states, "written by a ghost writer. Me? Just a traveler floating within the wave of globalization." Culminating with the park's opening ceremony, Fang creates a space where history seems to have been completely consumed and absorbed by contemporary social movements. It is both a labyrinth to get lost in and a pavilion made of reflective glass. Hu Fang is a novelist, art critic, and the co-founder and artistic director of Vitamin Creative Space, a project and gallery space dedicated to contemporary art exploration and searching for an independent working mode, specifically geared to the contemporary Chinese context. He lives and works in Beijing and Guangzhou. ]

"New Species of Spaces." E-Flux 11 (Dec. 2009).

"Wittgenstein's House." E-Flux 24 (April 2011).

"Wu Yongfang, the Hunger Artist." E-Flux 16 (May 2010)


Hu Feng 胡风
"My Self-Criticism." In Gibbs, guest ed. Chinese Studies in Literature 1 (1979): 65-89.

Poems in: Kai-yu Hsu, Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry, 349-57.

"Realism: A 'Correction'." Tr. Catherine Pease Campbell. In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 345-55.

"Realism Today." Tr. Paul Pickowicz. In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 485-90.

"What Do the Broad Masses Demand of Literature?" Tr. Richard King. In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 415-17.

"What the Grass Said to the Sun." Chinese Literature 6 (Jun 1981): 96-99.


Hu Ko
Locust Tree Village. A Play in Five Acts. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1961.


Hu Lanqi
"In a German Women's Prison.” Tr. Hu Mingliang. In Amy D. Dooling, ed., Writing Women in Modern China The Revolutionary Years, 1936-1976. NY: Columbia UP, 2005, 70-80.


Hu Ping
"The Eyes of China." In Thomas E. Moran, ed., Unofficial Histories: Chinese Reportages from the Era of Reform. Boulder: Westview Press, 1997.

The Thought Remolding Campaign of the Chinese Communist Party-State. Trs/eds. Philip F. Williams and Yenna Wu. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2012.

[Abstract: This authoritative work on the Chinese Communist party’s practices of reeducation and indoctrination, supersedes all previous works by bringing into account recent events. Hu Ping has provided a rich and rigorous study based not only in historical research and numerous compelling case studies of Chinese intellectuals, but also in a first person account of his own experience of Maoist thought “remolding.” The Thought Remolding Campaign of the Chinese Communist Party-State is an important history not only of the reeducation programs, but of the interrogation processes of the Party, and the strategies of either evasion or rebellion that released prisoners adopted.

Hu Qiu (Hu Chiu)
"Day the New Director Came." In Saturday Afternoon at the Mill and Other One-Act Plays. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1957, 50-78.

.
Hu Qiuyuan
"Do Not Encroach upon Literary Art." Tr. Jane Parish Yang. In Kirk A. Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 363-66.


Hu Shi 胡适
"The Biography of Li Chao" [1919]. Chinese Studies of History 31, 2 (Winter 1997/98): 36-47.

"A Chinese Declaration of the Rights of Women." Chinese Social and Political Science Review 8, 2 (April 1924): 100-09.

The Chinese Renaissance. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1934.

A Collection of Hu Shi's English Writings. Ed. Chou Chih-p'ing. Taibei: Yuanliu, 1995.

"Conflicts of Cultures." In Frank Rawlinson, ed., China Christian Yearbook, 1929. Shanghai: 1930, 112-21.

"The Greatest Event in Life" [Zhongshen dashi]. In E. Gunn, ed., Twentieth-Century Chinese Drama: An Anthology. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 1-9. Also in A.E. Zucker ed., The Chinese Theater. Boston: Little Brown, 1925, 119-28. Aslo in Xiaomei Chen, ed., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama. NY: Columbia UP, 2010, 57-65.

"Ibsenism." In Elizabeth Eide, China's Ibsen: From Ibsen to Ibsenism. London: Curzon Press, 1980, 155-68.

(Hu Suh). "Intellectual China in 1919." Chinese Social and Political Science Review 5, 4 (Dec. 1919): 345-55.

"The Literary Renaissance." In Sophia H. Chen Zen ed., Symposium on Chinese Culture. Shanghai: China Institute of Pacific Relations, 1931, 150-64.

(Hu Suh). "The Literary Revolution in China." Chinese Social and Political Science Review 6, 2 (1922): 91-100.

"My Autobiographical Account at Forty." Tr. Li Yu-ning. In Li Yu-Ning, ed., Two Self-Portraits: Liang Ch’i-ch’ao and Hu Shih. Bronxville, NY: Outer Sky Press, 1992, 32-188.

"On Hong Kong." Tr. Zhu Zhiyu. Renditions 29/30 (Spring/Aut. 1988): 45-46.

"Literature." In Sophia H. Chen Zen ed., Symposium on Chinese Culture. Shanghai: China Institute of Pacific Relations, 1931, 129-41.

Poems in: Twentieth Century Chinese Poetry: An Anthology. Hsu Kai-yu, ed. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1963, 1-3; Anthology of Modern Chinese Poetry. Ed/tr. Michelle Yeh. New Haven: Yale UP, 1992, 1.

"Religion and Philosophy in Chinese History." In Sophia H. Chen Zen ed., Symposium on Chinese Culture. Shanghai: China Institute of Pacific Relations, 1931, 31-58.

"The Reminiscences of Dr. Hu Shih." Tr. Li Yu-ning. In Li Yu-Ning, ed., Two Self-Portraits: Liang Ch’i-ch’ao and Hu Shih. Bronxville, NY: Outer Sky Press, 1992, 189-241.

"The Renaissance in China." Journal of the Royal Institute of International Affairs 5, 6 (Nov. 1926): 265-83.

"The Social Message in Chinese Poetry." Chinese Social and Political Science Review 7, 1 (Jan. 1923): 66-79.

"Some Modest Proposals for the Reform of Literature." In Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1996, 123-39.

"The Significance of the New Thought" (partial). In J. Mason Gentzler, ed., Changing China: Readings in the History of China From the Opium War to the Present. NY: Praeger, 1977, 177-80.

"A Systematic Study of China’s Cultural Heritage." Tr. Li Yu-ning. In Li Yu-Ning, ed., Two Self-Portraits: Liang Ch’i-ch’ao and Hu Shih. Bronxville, NY: Outer Sky Press, 1992, 242-49.

"Two Wings of One Bird: A Chinese Attitude Toward Eastern and Western Civilization." Pacific Affairs 1, 1 (May 1928): 1-8.


Hu Wanchun
Man of a Special Cut. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1963. [contains "Spot of Red in the Sky," "Man of a Special Cat," "Instructor Chiang," "It Happened at the Steel Mill," "Flesh and Blood," "Waht Instructor Pu-Kao Thought," "The Road"]

"Twilight Years." Tr. Michael Gotz. In Kai-yu Hsu, ed., Literature of the People's Republic of China. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1980, 620-27.


Hu Xin
"A Pink Humor." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 85-87.

"My View on Women." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 89-94.

"Women's Footprint of Pain: Preface for the Reprint of Four Women of Forty." In Hui Wu, ed., Once Iron Girls: Essays on Gender by Post-Mao Chinese Literary Women. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2010, 83-84.


Hu Xudong
"A Short Chapter," "Tibetan Medicine," "Written at Waterside." Trs. George O'Connell and Diana Shi. Atlanta Review xiv, 2 (Spring/Summer 2008): 54-57.


Hu Yepin
"Living Together." Tr. George Kennedy. In Harold Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, 1974, 207-214.

"A Poor Man." In Chinese Stories from the Thirties, vol. 1.


Hua Tong
"Yan'an Seed." Tr. Mark Caltonhill. Renditions 50 (1999): 24-35. Rpt. in Joseph S. M. Lau and Howard Goldblatt, eds., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature. NY: Columbia UP, 2007, 251-61.


Hua Yan
Daughter of Autumn. Tr. Wen Ha Hsiung. Taipei: The Woman Magazine, 1978.

Lamp of Wisdom. Tr. Nancy C. Ing. Taipei: The Woman Magazine, 1974.

"Poor Soul." Tr. Faye Peng Shen. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1973): 54-76. Republished in Chinese Women Writers' Association, eds., The Muse of China: A Collection of Prose and Short Stories. Taipei: Chinese Women Writers' Association, 1974, 37-59.


Huanzhulouzhu
Blades from the Willows Trilogy. Tr. Robert Chard. London: Wellsweep, 1997. Vol 1: Blades fnd Masters of the Way. [marital arts fiction]


Huan Fu
Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 99-103.


Huang Biyun (Wong Bik Wan)
"Losing the City" (Shi cheng). Tr. Martha Cheung. In Martha P.Y. Cheung, ed., Hong Kong Collage: Contemporary Stories and Writing. HK: Oxford University Press, 1998, 205-32.

"Plenty and Sorrow." Tr. Janice Wickeri. In Renditions 47/48 (Spring/Autumn 1997): 53-72. Also in Hong Kong Stories: Old Themes and New Voices. HK: Renditions, 1999, 126-158.

"She's Woman, I'm Woman." In Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, and Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One's Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 287-300.

"She's a Young Woman and So Am I." Tr. Naifei Ding. In Patricia Sieber, ed., Red Is Not the Only Color: Contemporary Chinese Fiction on Love and Sex between Women, Collected Stories. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, 37-48.


Huang Canran 黄灿然
Poems in: Qingping Wang, ed. Push Open the Window: Contemporary Poetry from China. Port Townsend, WA: Copper Canyon Press, 2012.


Huang Chunming (Hwang Ch'un-ming) 黄春明
"Ah-Ban and the Cop." Tr. Howard Goldblattt. The Chinese Pen (Summer, 1981): 94-98. Also in Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013, 81-84.

"Dead Again?" In Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013, 21-26.

The Drowning of an Old Cat and Other Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1980.

"Father's Writings Have Been Republished, Or, The Sexuality of Women Students in a Taibei Bookstore." Tr. Raymond N. Tang. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 204-208.

"The Fish." Tr. Linda Wu. In Nancy Ing, ed., Winter Plum: Contemporary Chinese Fiction. Taipei: Chinese Materials Center, 1982, 165-77. Also in The Drowning of an Old Cat and Other Stories, 1-11. Also in: Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013, 11-20.

"A Flower in the Rainy Night." Tr. Earl Wieman. In Joseph S.M. Lau, ed., Chinese Stories From Taiwan: 1960-1970. NY: Columbia UP, 1976, 195-241.

Le Gong [French tr. of Luo; The Gong]. Trs. Emmanuelle Pechenart and Anne Wu. Arles: Actes Sud, 2001.

"His Son's Big Doll." Tr. John Hu. In Chi Pang-yuan, et al., eds., An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Literature. Taipei: National Institute for Compilation and Translation, 1975, II, 321-42. Also in The Drowing of an Old Cat and Other Stories. 37-60. Also in Kwok-kan Tam, Terry Siu-Han Yip, Wimal Dissanayake, eds., A Place of One's Own: Stories of Self in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. NY: Oxford UP, 1999, 143-64.

Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013. ["The Fish," "Dead Again?," "The Pocket Watch," "Set Free," "Ah-ban and the Cop," "No Talking to the Driver," "Two Sign Painters," "I Love Mary"]

"Hung T'ung, the Mad Artist." Tr. Jack Langlois. In Wai-lim Yip, ed., Chinese Arts and Literature: A Survey of Recent Trends. Occasional Papers/Reprint Series in Contemporary Asian Studies. Baltimore, 1977, 117-26.

"I Love Mary." Tr. Howard Goldblatt. In Joseph S.M. Lau, ed., The Unbroken Chain: An Anthology of Taiwan Fiction Since 1926. Bloomington: IUP, 1983, 133-74. Also in: Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013, 121-70.

"No Talking to the Driver." In Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013, 85-90.

"The Pocket Watch." Tr. Howard Goldblatt. Asymptote (July 2012). Also in Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013, 27-38.

"Sayonara, Tsai Chien." Tr. Howard Goldblatt. Renditions 7 (1977): 133-60. Also in The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1975): 1-66, and in The Drowning of an Old Cat, 217-70.

"Set Free." In Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013, 39-80.

The Taste of Apples. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia UP, 2001. [includes: "The Fish," "The Drowning of an Old Cat," "His Son's Big Doll," "The Gong," "Ringworms," "The Taste of Apples," "Xiaoqi's Cap," "The Two Sign Painters," "Sayonara, Zaijian"]

"Two Sign Painters." Tr. David Steelman. The Chinese Pen (Winter, 1977): 48-87. Also in The Drowning of an Old Cat and Other Stories, 185-216. Also in Huang Chunming: Stories. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. HK: Renditions Paperbacks, 2013, 91-120.

"Waiting for a Flower's Name" [Dengdai yiduo hua de mingzi]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 345-49.

"We Cant' Bring Back the Past" [Wangshi zhi neng huimei]. Tr. David Pollard. In Pollard, ed., The Chinese Essay. NY: Columbia UP, 2000, 340-45.

"Young Widow." In Rosemary Haddon, tr./ed , Oxcart: Nativist Stories from Taiwan, 1934-1977. Dortmund: Projekt Verlag, 1996, 221-304.


Huang Fan (PRC) 黄梵
"Emotional Phenomena." Tr. Zhen Zhen and Jeffrey Twitchell-Waas. Facture 1 (2000): 209-210. Also in "Emotional Phenomenon." Interpoetics: Poetry of Asia and the Pacific Rim 1, 2 (Spring 1998).

"Go Toward." Tr. Chang Hui and Jeffrey Twitchell. World Literature Today 71:1 (1997): 38.

Poems in: Original: Chinese Language-Poetry Group, A Writing Anthology. Tr. Jeff Twitchell. Afterword by J.H. Prynne. Brighton, England: Parataxis Press, 1995. 90-93.

"Poetry's New Shore: Language." Tr. Yunte Huang. boundary 2 26, 1 (1999): 145-146.

"Recollection," "The Drama of Our Growth," "Indicator." Tr. Jeff Twitchell. Exact Change Yearbook No. 1. Ed. Peter Gizzi. Boston: Exact Change-Carcanet, 1995. 33-34.


Huang Fan (Taiwan) 黃凡
"From Taibei's Suburbs, Into the Hubbub of Taiwan's Economic Miracle." Tr. Ellen Lai-shan Yeung. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 247-52.

"The Intelligent Man." Tr. Hwang Ying-tsih. The Chinese Pen (Summer 1990): 71-81.

"Lai Suo." Tr. Robert anc Candice P. Eno. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1985): 47-84. Also trans. by Eric B. Cohen. In Michael S. Duke, Worlds of Modern Chinese Fiction. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991, 76-98.

"Lai Suo." [French translation]. Tr. Marc Gilbert. In Angel Pino and Issabelle Rabut, eds., A mes frères du village de garrison: Anthologie de nouvelles taiwanaises contemporaines. Paris: Blue de China, 2001, 11-54..

"A Man of Scruples, Shu-ming Fan, The Just and the Fair." Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Autumn 1988): 59-82.

"A Rainy Night." Tr. Chou Chang Jun-mei and Eva Shan Chou. The Chinese Pen (Spring 1983): 1-26.

Zero and Other Fictions. Tr. John Balcolm. NY: Columbia University Press, 2011.

[Abstract: Huang Fan burst onto Taiwan's literary scene in the 1980s, publishing pointed urban portraits and political satires that captured the reading public's attention. After decades of innovative work, he is now one of Asia's most celebrated authors, crucial to understanding the development of Taiwanese literature over the past fifty years. The first collection of Huang Fan's work to appear in English, this anthology includes Zero, a prize-winning dystopian novella echoing George Orwell's chilling 1984. Set in a postapocalyptic world, Zero features Xi De, a young man raised in an elite community who risks everything to challenge his society's charismatic leader and technocratic rule. Huang Fan's novella poignantly illustrates the quandary of an idealistic man trapped among conflicting claims to truth, unsure whether to think of himself as heroic or foolish in his ultimate choice of resistance and sacrifice. This anthology also features three critically acclaimed short stories: "Lai Suo," which established Huang Fan's reputation as a groundbreaking author; "The Intelligent Man"; and "How to Measure the Width of a Ditch." In "Lai Suo," a naïve individual becomes the pawn of powerful men intent on political advancement. In "How to Measure the Width of a Ditch," an unreliable narrator spins an absurdist, metafictional tale of his childhood in Taipei, and in "The Intelligent Man," Huang Fan weaves an allegorical satire about political reunification set against a backdrop of Taiwanese migration to the United States, with a trenchant look at expanding business interests in mainland China and Southeast Asia. All together, these remarkable works portray the tensions and aspirations of modern Taiwan. ]


Huang Gang
"Wang Jingwei devant le camera." Tr. Noel Dutrait. In Dutrait, ed., Ici respire la vie aussi: litterature de reportage, 1926-1982. Aix-en-Provence: Alinea, 1986, 75-95.


Huang Guobin (Huang Kuo-pin)
"Eight Selected Poems." Tr. Huang Kuo-pin. Renditions 29/30 (Spring/Aut. 1988): 199-209.


Huang Hengqiu (Huang Heng-ch'iu)
Poems, trs. K.C. Tu and Robert Backus, in Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 16 (2005): 149-52.

"Reflections on Hakka Literature in Taiwan." Tr. Yingtsih Huang. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series 16 (2005): 171-84.


Huang Jisu, Zhang Guangtian, and Shen Lin
"Che Guevara." Tr. Jonathan S. Noble. MCLC Resource Center Publication (2006). Also in Xiaomei Chen, ed., The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Drama. NY: Columbia UP, 2010, 927-65.


Huang Jianhua
"'Iron Arhat' and 'Jade Guanyin'." Tr. Wang Chiying. Chinese Literature (Summer 1997).


Huang Jinming 黄金明
"A Corner of Milky Way Park, In Pearl Square, A Building's History of Collapse." Tr. Chris Song Zijiang. Pathlight (Winter, 2013): 177-80.


Huang Juan
"A Marriage Has Been Arranged." In Nieh Hua-ling, ed. and trans., Eight Stories by Chinese Women. Taipei: Heritage Press, 1962, 3-22.


Huang Lianghe (Wong Leung Wo)
"At Midnight," "I See Your Shoes in the Bathroom," "Father," "This is the Last Day," "The Story of Santa," "and I Thought We Wouldn't Meet Again." Tr. Canaan Morse. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 1 (2011): 129-34.


Huang Meishu
"Cathay Visions (The Empty Cage)." Tr. by the Author. In Martha Cheung and Jane Lai, eds., An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. NY: Oxford UP, 1997, 455-99.


Huang Qiuyun
"Do Not Close Your Eyes to the Suffering of the People." Tr. John Balcom. In Helen Siu, ed., Furrows, Peasants, Intellectuals and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Stanford: SUP, 1990, 289-92.

"Do Not Close Your Eyes to the Suffering of the People." In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 72-74.

"Java Bull Takes Sick Leave." In Hualing Nieh, ed. and co-trans., Literature of the Hundred Flowers Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia University Press, 1981, 337-51.

"Self-Criticism." In Hualing Nieh, ed. and co-trans., Literature of the Hundred Flowers Volume II: Poetry and Fiction. NY: Columbia University Press, 1981, 352-63.

"Where Are the Thorns?" In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 75-80.


Huang Shi
"Fang Wan's Paradise." Tr. Yanbing Chen. In Henry YH Zhao, Yanbing Chen, and John Rosenwald. Fissures: Chinese Writing Today. Brookline, MA: Zephyr Press, 2000, 282-301.


Huang Sicheng
"The Graduation Banquet." Tr. Howard Goldblatt. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1974): 23-32.

"The THC Tab." Tr. Jon Solomon. Renditions 29-30 (1988): 102-107.


Huang Xiang
A Bilingual Edition of Poetry Out of Communist China by Huang Xiang. Tr. Andrew G. Emerson. Lewiston, NY: Mellen Press, 2004. [MCLC Resource Center review by Dian Li]

"9 Poems." Tr. Andrew G. Emerson. MCLC Resource Center Publication (Dec. 2000). ["Dry Bones," "Singing Alone," "China, You Can't Remain Silent," "Solitary Confinement," "Guitar," "I See a War," "Silent Grainfield in the Distance," "We've Been Kept Apart for So Long," "Womb"]

"Confessions of the Great Wall." In Roger Garside, Coming Alive: China After Mao. NY: McGraw Hill, 1981, 291-93.

"I See a War." In Roger Garside, Coming Alive: China After Mao. NY: McGraw Hill, 1981, 287-88.

"No, You Have Not Died." In Roger Garside, Coming Alive: China After Mao. NY: McGraw Hill, 1981, 293-96.

"Song of the Torch." In Roger Garside, Coming Alive: China After Mao. NY: McGraw Hill, 1981, 289-91.


Huang Yaomian
"Away with All Taboos Regarding Literary Criticism." In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 97-100.

"Thoughts from the Hundred Flowers Blooming." In Hualing Nieh, ed., Literature of the Hundred Flowers, Volume I: Criticism and Polemics. NY: Columbia UP, 1981, 101-4.


Huang Ying
"My House is for Sale." Tr. Chen I-djen. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1990): 1-26. Also trans. as "Selling House and Home" by Cathy Poon. Renditions 35-36 (1991): 87-102. Rpt. in Eva Hung, ed., City Women. HK: Renditions, 2001.


Huang Youde
"Ah Yi the Madman and Ah Zhu the Saint." Tr. Janice Wickeri. Renditions 35-36 (1991): 171-87.


Huang Yunde
"Farewell to Farewell." Tinfish 4 (1997).

"Tofu Your Life." Tinfish 4 (1997).


Huang Zunxian
"Hong Kong." Tr. T.C. Lai. Renditions 29/30 (Spring/Aut. 1988): 63.

"Preface to Poems from the Hut in the Human World." Tr. Michelle Yeh. In K. Denton, ed., Modern Chinese Literary Thought: Writings on Literature, 1893-1945. Stanford: SUP, 1996, 69-70.

"Selections from Huang Zunxian's Writings on Japan." Trs. Jack W. Chen and Yunshuang Zhang. Renditions 79 (Spring 2013); 59-70.

Huang Zuolin
“On Mei Lanfang and Chinese Traditional Theater.” In Faye Chunfang Fei, ed./tr., Chinese Theories of Theater and Performance from Confucius to the Present. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1999, 154-58.

[J]

Ji Dawei (Chi Tawei)
"A Stranger’s ID." Tr. Fran Martin. In Martin, ed., Angelwings: Contemporary Queer Fiction from Taiwan. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2003, 213-220. Reprinted as "A Stranger's ID." Asymptote (Jan. 2012).


Ji Dongliang
"Black Hen, White Hen." In Loud Sparrows: Contemporary Chinese Short-Shorts. Trs. Aili Mu, Julie Chiu, and Howard Goldblatt. NY: Columbia University Press, 2006, 84-86.


Ji Ji
"Beyond Transient Applause." Trs. Eva Hung and D.E. Pollard, D. E. Renditions 35/36 (1991): 299-304.

"Death in an Alien Land." Tr. Christopher M. Lupke. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1986): 66-91.

"The Jade Bracelet." Tr. Stephen Harder. The Chinese Pen (Spring, 1979): 1-31.


Ji Xian (Chi Hsien)
Poems in: China, China: Contemporary Poetry from Taiwan, Republic of China. Eds. Germain Groogenbroodt and Peter Stinson. Ninove, Belgium: Point Books, 1986.


Jia Baoquan
“An Offering Gathered from That Cherished Homeland.” Tr. Chen Hong and Thelma Jones. In Jianing Chen, ed. Themes in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Beijing: New World Press, 1993, 77-85.


Jia Pingwa
"Artemesia." Tr. Yu Fanqin. Chinese Literature (Summer 1987): 3-26.

La capitale dechue. Tr. Genevieve Imbot-Bichet. Stock, 1997.

The Castle. Tr. Shao-Pin Luo. Toronto: York Press, 1997.

"Chess Players" [Yi ren]. Trs. Qian Jin and Zhao Jingyan. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 1195-99.

"Duan Yang." Chinese Literature 6 (June 1979): 79-82.

"Family Chronicle of a Wooden Bowl Maker." Tr. Zhu Hong. In Zhu Hong, ed., The Chinese Western. NY: Ballantine, 1988, 100-17. Also in Spring of Bitter Waters: Short Fiction from China Today. London: W.H. Allen and Co., 1989.

“The Good Fortune Grave.” Tr. Ling Yuan. In Heavenly Rain. Beijing: Panda Books, 1996, 124-98.

"Floodtime." Tr. Margaret H. Decker. In Helen F. Siu, ed., Furrows: Peasants, Intellectuals, and the State: Stories and Histories from Modern China. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1990, 238-61.

"Greasy Moon." Tr. John Balcolm. In New Penguin Parallel Text Short Stories in Chinese. Ed. John Balcolm. NY: Penguin Books, 2013, 167-202.

The Heavenly Hound. Beijing: Panda, 1991. [stories of the Shanxi countryside]

"Heavenly Hound." Tr. Li Rui. In Jianing Chen, ed. Themes in Contemporary Chinese Literature. Beijing: New World Press, 1993, 244-59.

Heavenly Rain (Wan yu). Beijing: Panda Books, 1996. [contains four novellas, “Heavenly Rain,” “The Good Fortune Grave,” “The Regrets of the Bride Carrier,” and “The Monk King of Tiger Mountain”]

“Heavenly Rain.” Tr. Richard Seldin. In Heavenly Rain. Beijing: Panda Books, 1996, 1-123.

"A Helping Hand." Chinese Literature 3 (Mar. 1978): 41-47.

"How Much Can a Man Bear?" Tr. Zhu Hong. In Zhu Hong, ed., The Chinese Western. NY: Ballantine, 1988, 1-52. Also in Spring of Bitter Waters: Short Fiction from China Today. London: W.H. Allen and Co., 1989.

"Life Is Changing, Even In Hilly Shangzhou." Tr. Peter Li. In Helmut Martin, ed., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 100-105.

“A Little Peach Tree.” Tr. Eileen Cheng-yin Chow. Chinese Literature (Summer 1993): 142-46.

“The Monk King of Tiger Mountain.” Tr. Josephine A. Matthews. In Heavenly Rain. Beijing: Panda Books, 1996, 305-416.

"Moon Traces" [Yue ji]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 178-80.

“Portrait of a Writer.” Tr. Eileen Cheng-yin Chow. Chinese Literature (Summer 1993): 162-70.

“Qinqiang.” Trs. Eileen Cheng-yin Chow. Chinese Literature (Summer 1993): 146-56.

"Qiqiao'er." Tr. Shen Zhen. Chinese Literature 7 (1983): 5-25.

"Reading the Mountain" [Du shan]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 183-85.

“The Regrets of the Bride Carrier.” Tr. Josephine A. Matthews. In Heavenly Rain. Beijing: Panda Books, 1996, 199-304.

"Shasha and the Pigeons." Tr. Hu Zhihui. Chinese Literature 7 (July 1983): 26-39.

"Shanxi Opera" [Qin qiang]. Tr. Martin Woesler. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 186-94.

"The Song of the Forest." Chinese Literature 11 (1980): 100-107.

“The Sounds of Night.” Tr. Eileen Cheng-yin Chow. Chinese Literature (Summer 1993): 156-62.

"Spring." Trs. Ren Zhong and Yuzhi Yang. In Hometowns and Childhood. San Francisco: Long River Press, 2005, 193-98.

"Touch Paper." Tr. David Pattinson. In Yang Bian, ed., The Time is Not Ripe: Contemporary China's Best Writers and Their Stories. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1991, 112-48.

Turbulence. Tr. H. Goldblatt. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Press, 1987.

"Two Sisters." Chinese Literature 4 (Apr. 1979): 64-74.

"The Ugly Rock" [Chou shi]. Trs. Qian Jin and Zhao Jingyan. In Martin Woesler, ed., 20th Century Chinese Essays in Translation. Bochum: Bochum UP, 2000, 181-82.

"The Young Man and His Apprentice." Chinese Literature 3 (Mar. 1978): 34-40.


Jia Wei
"Edge," "Black Rails," and "Scene A." In Wang Ping, ed., New Generation: Poems from China Today. New York: Hanging Loose Press, 1999, 63-68.


Jian Minzhen
"A Silver Needle Falls on the Ground." Tr. Nancy C. Ing. The Chinese Pen (Summer, 1990): 82-94.


Jiang Guangci
"Hassan." In Harold Isaacs, ed., Straw Sandals: Chinese Short Stories, 1918-1933. Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, 1974, 170-173.


Jiang Gui
"The Swallows of Hu-kuo Temple." Tr. Carlos G. Tee. The Chinese Pen (Winter 1993): 68-83.

A Translation fo the Chinese Novel Chung-yang (Rival Suns) by Chiang Kuei (1908-1980). Tr. by Timothy A. Ross. Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1999.

The Whirlwind. Tr. Timothy Ross, San Francisco: Chinese Materials Center, 1977. Chapter 9 of the novel was published as "The Whirlwind." Tr. Timothy Ross. Renditions 2 (1974): 118-25. Another extract is published as "Snakes and Ghosts" in Lucian Wu, ed., New Chinese Writing. Taipei: Heritage Press, 1962, 103-120.


Jiang Kanghu
On Chinese Studies. Taibei: 1976 rpt. of 1934 original.


Jiang Rong
Wolf Totem. Tr. Howard Goldblatt. NY: Penguin, 2008. [MCLC Resource Center review by Howard Y. F. Choy]


Jiang Qing
On the Revolution of Peking Opera. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1968.

"On the Revolution in Peking Opera (Tan Jingju geming)." Tr. Jessa Ka Yee Chan. The Opera Quarterly 26, 2-3 (Spring-Summer 2010): 455-59.

“Revolutionizing Beijing Opera.” In Faye Chunfang Fei, ed./tr., Chinese Theories of Theater and Performance from Confucius to the Present. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1999, 166-69.

"Why I Parted with T'ang Na." In Yu-ning Li, ed., Chinese Women Through Chinese Eyes. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 216-26.


Jiang Weishui (Chiang Wei-shui)
"Clinical Notes." Tr. Steven L. Riep. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series no. 20 (2007): 125-28.

"Random Notes from Prison." Tr. Fanc Shelton and Liu Heng-hsing. Taiwan Literature: English Translation Series no. 20 (2007): 129-38.


Jiang Xiaoyun
"A Day For Losing Umbrellas." Tr. David Steelman. The Chinese Pen (Spring, 1978): 1-54.

"Floret." Tr. Norma Liu Hsiao. The Chinese Pen (Spring, 1989): 68-107.

"Journey To Mount Bliss." Tr. Helena Chang Hsu. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1983): 27-59. Also in Ann C. Carver and Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang, eds., Bamboo Shoots After the Rain: Contemporary Stories by Women Writers of Taiwan. NY: The Feminist Press, 1990, 188-209.

"My Fair Gentleman." Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1990): 63-83.

"Niu Teh-kuei." Tr. Candice Pong. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1979): 1-17.

"Siu Yuan: Complying With Fate." Tr. Candice Pong. The Chinese Pen (Winter, 1980): 1-20.

"Tears." Tr. Hua-yuan Li Mowry. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1982): 79-97.


Jiang Xun (Chiang Hsun)
Poems in: The Isle Full of Noises: Modern Chinese Poetry from Taiwan. Ed/tr. Dominic Cheung. NY: Columbia UP, 1987, 201-11.


Jiang Yitan
"China Story." Tr. Eric Abrahamsen. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 1 (2011): 51-70.


Jiang Zidan
"Waiting for Dusk." Tr. Ronald de Sousa. In Shu-ning Sciban and Fred Edwards, eds., Dragonflies: Fiction by Chinese Women in the Twentieth Century (East Asia Series 115). Ithaca: East Asia Program, Cornell University, 2003, 136-71.


Jiang Zilong
All the Colours of the Rainbow. Beijing: Panda, 1983.

"The Foundation." In Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds./trs. Mao's Harvest: Voices from China's New Generation. NY: Oxford UP, 1983, 128-46.


Jiang Yun 蔣韵
"Lanterns for the Dead." Tr. John Balcolm. In New Penguin Parallel Text Short Stories in Chinese. Ed. John Balcolm. NY: Penguin Books, 2013, 139-66.

"The Red Detachment of Women." Tr. Annelise Finegan Wasmeon. Pathlight: New Chinese Writing (Summer 2013).


Jiao Juyin
“Spoken Drama: Learning from the Traditional Theater.” In Faye Chunfang Fei, ed./tr., Chinese Theories of Theater and Performance from Confucius to the Present. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1999, 159-65.


Jiao Tong
Erotic Recipes: A Complete Menu for Male Potency Enhancement. København, Los Angeles: Green Integer, 2000.


Jin He
"Second Encounter." [story]. In Helen F. Siu and Zelda Stern, eds./trs. Mao's Harvest: Voices from China's New Generation. NY: Oxford UP, 1983, 179-98.


Jin Jian
"Zhao Xiaolan." In The Women's Representative: Three One-Act Plays. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1956, 1-43.


Jin Qingmai
"Break With Self and Foster Devotion to the Public and Write for the Revolution." Chinese Literature 2 (Feb. 1967); 92-112.

"How I Conceived and Wrote The Song of Ouyang Hai." Chinese Literature 11 (Nov. 1966): 105-19.

The Song of Ou-yang Hai. Trs. Sidney Shapiro and Tung Chen-sheng. Beijing: Foreign Languages Press, 1966.


Jin Renshu
"Skylark." Pathlight: New Chinese Writing 2 (2012): 144-57.


Jin Yong (or Zha Liangyong, or Louis Cha)
"Against the Authors of 'Foreign Books in Chinese Language': An Interview with China's Most Popular Writer of Adventure Novels--Jin Yong." In Helmut Martin and Jeffrey Kinkley, eds., Modern Chinese Writers: Self-portrayals. Armonk, NY : M.E. Sharpe, 1992, 171-80.

The Book and the Sword. Tr. Graham Earnshaw. HK: Oxford UP, 2004.

The Deer and the Cauldron: a Martial Arts Novel. Tr. John Minford. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Foxy Volant of the Snowy Mountain. Tr. Olivia Mok. HK: Hong Kong University Press, 1996.

[Louis Cha]. Return of the Condor Heroes. Tr. Eileen Zhong. Singapore: Asiapac, 1997.

"Sword of the Yueh Maiden." [posted on the Heroic-Cinema.com website, but translator is not indicated]


Jin Yun
Uncle Doggie's Nirvana. Tr. Ying Ruocheng. In Martha Cheung and Jane Lai, eds., An Oxford Anthology of Contemporary Chinese Drama. NY: Oxford UP, 1997, 92-147. Also tr. as "The Nirvana of Grandpa Doggie." In Shiao-Ling Yu, ed., Chinese Drama after the Cultural Revolution, 1979-1989. Lewiston: Edwin Mellen Press, 1996, 349-422.

Uncle Doggie's Nirvana [bilingual edition]. Tr. Ying Ruocheng. Beijng: China Translation and Publishing Corp, 1999.


Jin Zhao
"A Memorable Memorial Service." Tr. Samuel Ling. The Chinese Pen (Winter, 1982): 35-56.

"The Struggle Over Tests." Tr. Mark Friedman. The Chinese Pen (Autumn, 1981): 61-87.


Jing Ji
"The Twilight Years." Tr. Michelle Yeh. The Chinese Pen (Winter, 1991): 32-49.


Jing Xianghai
"The Bus Driver's Face." Tr. Lee Yew Leong. Asymptote (Jan. 2012).

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